1. intelli656
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    intelli656 New Member

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    idiom question

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by intelli656, Jul 24, 2011.

    Could someone tell me the meaning of the phrase 'just as well' in the following context?

    It ain't because I don't love you. Just as well and more ,my pretty poppet. It's because I thought it better for you.

    These lines are from David Copperfield by Dickens. I don't believe that the second to last period is supposed to be placed there, but Dickens broke sentences into fragments in the paragraph that incorporates these lines for an effect in the story.

    Thanks
     
  2. Trish
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    Trish I've been deleted.. again Contributor

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    I can't believe no one has answered this.:confused:


    It means she loves him "just as well" (as she always has), and even more (if possible). So in simpler terms - just as well = the same
     
  3. digitig
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    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

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    I can only see two periods, so when you say "second to last period" do you mean the first period?
     
  4. digitig
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    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

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    Most of us in the country most familiar with Dickens's idioms were asleep! :rolleyes:
     
  5. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    there are 3... the second is after 'poppet'... and it is correctly placed... fragments are acceptable in fiction and usually quite effective...
     
  6. digitig
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    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

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    You're right, of course. Brain fade.
     
  7. Trish
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    Trish I've been deleted.. again Contributor

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    I think people in the US (and others) have read Dickens haven't they? I was surprised. It had been up for three hours and there were so many people on!
     
  8. digitig
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    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

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    Oh, quite possibly. Or have at least seen A Muppet Christmas Carol. But they're our idioms. :)
     
  9. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    uh... yes, many of us have... along with the bard, miss christie, and all the other stars in the british literary crown... :rolleyes:
     
  10. Trish
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    Trish I've been deleted.. again Contributor

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    I was being sarcastic, lol. And "just as well" is used just as much in the US, I'm sure. Just saying.
     
  11. teacherayala
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    teacherayala Contributing Member

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    I have a copy of Bleak House actually on my shelf. Getting up the nerve to actually attempt it...
     
  12. art
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    art Contributing Member Contributor

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    It starts with a description of the weather don't you know.:eek: Just terrible!

    Dickens has a few faults and one of them is that he can go on a bit...Begin with the understanding that it's not a criminal matter if you skip the odd paragraph of exquisite drivel and the thing might become less daunting (...and you might end up not skipping anything at all.)
     
  13. digitig
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    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

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    A description of the weather that we studied at university as an example of truly great writing because of the number of levels (semantic and grammatical) on which it prefigured the rest of the book.
     

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