1. cheeky_chatty
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    cheeky_chatty New Member

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    I'm Stuck!!!!

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by cheeky_chatty, Nov 24, 2011.

    Weirdly enough, I dream of my stories than write them...or finish what I start when I write. However, I have a great idea, but I don't know how to get it from my head to paper, and I'm in love with the story line. Also, does anyone have any motivation tips? I really love to write, but find it hard to do, with the schedule I have.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Jhunter
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    Jhunter Mmm, bacon. Contributor

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    You can try and make an outline before you begin the actual writing process. But as far as motivation, you have to get that on your own. There is no secret trick to that.
     
  3. cheeky_chatty
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    cheeky_chatty New Member

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    Hmmmm....not so much of what I was looking for. I guess what I'm trying to say is that I'm having a hard time placing what I see in my head, to making sure it's equally conveyed on paper. Also, I wasn't looking for motivation...but ideas from those with a full schedule, that still incorporate writing into it. Thanks though.
     
  4. foosicle
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    foosicle Member

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    Stop trying to write it for the time being. Use other mediums to capture the ideas. Only pick up the pen and paper when you feel comfortable.
     
  5. cheeky_chatty
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    cheeky_chatty New Member

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    Good idea :) I do have a lot of research to do...
     
  6. picklzzz
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    picklzzz Senior Member

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    I have this problem sometimes too. I tend to let it ruminate in my head for awhile. I write down the essence of what I want - which it never ends up being - just so I don't forget. I have many ideas each day and I have a Word file with each one. When I'm bored or need ideas, I go there and try to recapture my ideas. Then, I try to write an outline as a guide. I also have a ritual before I write where I take a long bath and think through the details. Then, I go write. I know when I do that it won't even be remotely what I want, but I try to get it down. Then, I begin again and chip away at it. It does take some motivation, and I need a good chunk of time for this, which I don't have. I find it hard to just write for an hour. I need several hours in a row to let my creativity flow. I find if I'm tired or moody, the words and ideas won't flow. I have to be in a particular mood. That's why I don't think i could be a professional writer. I cannot write on command. I have to be inspired and just let it go from there. But, as for you, put something down on paper so you don't forget the details and the main idea. Sometimes, I have ideas that don't seem related, but I put them all down together and then sort them later. You may feel good to have gotten something written down at least and then you can begin to craft your story from there. If it doesn't have the feel that you want, or the sequencing, or whatever else you feel may be lacking, you'll fix that. There's really no easy answer to your questions, but you just have to start or you won't finish! Good luck to you!
     
  7. Jhunter
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    Jhunter Mmm, bacon. Contributor

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    You specifically asked for "motivation tips," so if you don't want "motivation tips" don't ask for them. And outlining helps with getting your ideas on paper before you write it. It will make the process for you much easier. Though, not everyone outlines, but in your case of not being able to get your ideas out, it will indeed help you. Start small and with the most vivid ideas you see in your head and wright them down. Once you have enough ideas written down and a game plan for writing the actual story it will be easier for you.

    As far as scheduling tips (I assume this is what you really wanted tips for) try and set aside an hour or two a day to get some writing done. Even if you have to replace some other hobby or recreational activity. Books don't write themselves; you, yourself, have to decide how important is to you and then make it happen if it is what you really want to do.
     
  8. Fullmetal Xeno
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    Fullmetal Xeno Protector of Literature Contributor

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    Don't worry, this is quite normal. Try some new routes and try to find a new motivation to do it. Hoped this helped.
     
  9. Phoenix001
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    Phoenix001 New Member

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    I experience this all the time.
    The best thing I like to do is to, as useless as this may sound, start it.

    Just jot down a paragraph or two for an intro, and if you like what you see, just keep going with what makes sense.

    You could also try just making a poem about your story. This works for me alot, just trying to capture the essence of a character of event with just a few lines.
     
  10. Jethelin
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    Jethelin Member

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    This also works for me. I have an idea, but can't decide how to express it through writing, so I just sit down and start writing. It might come out horrible and more or less worthless, but at least I put an effort into starting it, and that effort gets my mind working and new and better ideas flowing. This is how I have started my new book and so far im a decent amount into writing it. It's worth trying at least in my opinion.
     
  11. ChickenFreak
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    ChickenFreak Contributing Member Contributor

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    To some extent, I think that this is a matter of practice. I've used the analogy of learning to drive--at first you're painfully conscious of carefully gauging how much to press the pedals, when to start steering a turn, when to release the wheel after a turn, and so on. And eventually you realize that these things have become entirely unconscious, and you're just driving.

    I think that the same thing is true of getting your thoughts from brain to fingers to keyboard to screen. It starts out incredibly awkward--you can't possibly type fast enough, and even if you could you're not sure what words to type, and it seems as if there's no link between mind and screen, and the action of typing and watching the screen seems to muffle the characters that are trying to talk in your head. But with enough writing, it starts to feel as if that link is forming. I don't know if I do this by slowing down my mind, or....well, I don't know what I do, but I know that the awkwardness is less and less, the more I write.

    So I'd suggest that you just write, and if you fear that you might somehow damage your mind's vision of the plots that are most precious to you during this practice phase, write something that's less valuable to you. And it will take a fair number of words--for example, I was probably thirty thousand words into my first NaNoWriMo before I noticed that the mind-to-screen process was a great deal less awkward than it had been when I first started. I've probably written at least a couple of hundred thousand words since then, and the link is still pretty flimsy-feeling. (Only a small percentage of those words have been fiction, though, and fiction is where it's flimsiest.)

    The thing that drives me to "just write something, for bleep's sake!" is my blog. Being part of a blog community, reading others' blogs and getting their comments on mine, motivates me to keep my blog alive. And then once I'm writing, that may motivate me to go on to work on something else--or if it frequently doesn't, at least I'm keeping my hand in.

    Editing since I noticed that you're more concerned about schedule: And a blog post can be a quite small bit of writing, so you go through the idea, writing, editing, and "publishing" cycle in a quite small amount of time.

    ChickenFreak
     
  12. mickelarr
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    mickelarr New Member

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    I think the suggestion to make an outline is pretty good, especially considering 1) You're not entirely clear on how to convey the details, but you think it's a strong story and 2) You are pressed for time. A good outline takes time itself, but think of it as an investment that will save you tons of confusion and editing later.

    As for your schedule, sometimes you just have to make time to write, if it's important to you. I get up a stinkin hour and a half early every day so I can get some writing in before work. I hate it, but that's where the time can come out of my schedule. You gotta do what you gotta do.

    Identify your time stealers (TV, internet, video games, wasting time with friends) and eliminate them. (Don't eliminate your friends; that's illegal.)
     
  13. Slinkywizard
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    Slinkywizard Member

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    @mickelarr

    Oh, god, me too. 6am every day, but there's no other part of my day with it to spare, so we suffer.
     
  14. Ocean Seven
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    Ocean Seven New Member

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    Much of my story has also come from dreams, but in reality, what I've actually used is a tiny fraction of what I've dreamed of. If you counted every single story I've started, you'd have something in the low triple digits. if you count just what has survived more then one or two years, or that was written recently ( <1 year) but has remained fairly strong, you'd have something in the low to mid double digits, (20-40, depending on if you count stories that merged as one as a while, or each one on their own. This doesn't include any of the 200+ Identification Databases (written blueprints) whose background sections often become stories in their own right.)

    All I can say is think about it. Look at the idea, see how long you can keep writing on that idea. If you run out of steam very fast, it probably isn't going to be worth trying to keep alive. That being said, that isn't a reason to ditch it entirely- I keep all my story ideas, weather they be dead or alive, and I've often rifled through the pages and found something I wrote years ago that works perfectly into my plot. (Even now, the original Project One Man War still offers up its depths of unwritten storyline to the revised version. I don't 'write' stories, I discover the words. The original OMW bears little resemblance to the current version, yet I can look back on the pencil-smeared pages and see what happens next, what happened before, what might happen.)
     
  15. AmyHolt
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    AmyHolt Contributing Member

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    Try keeping a notebook with you and when you have a few minutes (waiting at the doctors office or on a lunch break) scribble down the scene that has most recently been playing in your mind/dreams. Later you can type it up but it will be much easier (and take less time) with written notes. If you keep doing that eventually you have enough plot points to start really constructing a story.
     
  16. Tesoro
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    Tesoro Contributing Member Contributor

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    I think that's something most writers struggle with to some extent. Jhunters advice about outlining is actually a really good advice. Plus always keep a notebook close to the bed so you can write things down that comes to mind when you're about to fall asleep or when you wake up and had a vivid dream that you want to make sure not to forget.
     
  17. Prolixitasty
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    Prolixitasty Member

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    Live more. Your dreams provide an alternate reality which allows you to experience things which you would otherwise avoid, miss, or not encounter in real life. For example, if I dream about being mauled by a bear, and I remember it when I wake up (an important point), then I might be better suited to write about a bear attack then someone who has never dreamed the same or even thought of the same although I've never been attacked by a bear. Ultimately, the more you think about something, the more you'll have to say about it. I refer to this as 'incubation'. Your mind will work on problems even when you're not thinking about them, allow it to do so by simply relaxing and focusing on other things. It seems that you're lacking the discriptions you require to communicate your thoughts, which means that you need to get closer to what your imagining in any possible way. An author in a movie stood at the top of a building with her hands stretched out over the edge, after a few minutes she jumped. She jerked violently, and then woke up at her office desk. Her assistant walked in and asked, "what are you doing?", the author replied, "I was imagining what it's like to jump off buildings."

    For you to write about anything you have not directly experienced requires that you possess a strong imagination to begin with and then a great control of the language. It's not easy, and it makes sense that you're struggling with it. Sometimes the words work at their own pace, as a writer, a good one, you can only wait for them.
     
  18. Yasin
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    Yasin Member

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    I've found that it's not always the 'idea' of a story that's difficult to come up with. It's deciding on your writing style and being consistant with it. Maybe you should decide on a style of writing that you have seen that has inspired you and use it to motivate yourself.
     

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