1. AlphaOmega
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    AlphaOmega New Member

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    Images & Writing - I am interested & need help.

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by AlphaOmega, Mar 22, 2012.

    First off I am curious has anyone tried drawing an image to include in their books. Not cover... actually INSIDE the work itself.

    For example let's say you've created something entirely new - be it creature, device, etc - have you ever tried drawing it out alongside what could be considered the describtion of the creature, thing [they used to do this in the old fantasy novels].


    Secondly how do you put the image in the caption / side without literally screwing up the writing script?

    I am thinking of a 6" x 9" page booklet / novelet and yet can't figure how to put the image beside the written paragraph without screwing something up somewhere.

    Tips?
     
  2. jazzabel
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    jazzabel Contributing Member Contributor

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    It spounds like a great idea. I'd just do it like cookbooks do, the adjoining page to have an image on it (whole page).
     
  3. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    if you're using ms word, then options for including art work are available to you... just go to the 'help' menu and you'll find step-by-step directions... other programs probably have something similar...
     
  4. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    If you are planning on submitting to a publisher, don't include illustrations. A manuscript is all text, and publishers don't, as a rule, accept illustrations from the author.
     
  5. AlphaOmega
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    AlphaOmega New Member

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    The only reason why this concept was installed is generally because people can't draw and for the artists themselves when the concept was "novel" it wasn't the best of paying jobs.

    Then you had authors whom could actually write picturiously enough that people could envision what was happening.... unfortunately writing ability in general has gone downhill and yet publishers have yet to remove this early 1900s age-old thinking.


    One of the reasons why I prefer semi-graphic novels is because you get both the storyline and here and there images of individuals - a good example of this is the "Devil May Cry" novels where there is portraits of the important characters here and there throughout the story itself [I believe there is 6 images per story] and that is published work.

    As it is, unless it's changed drastically in the last few years, you can include maps [usually on the first few pages - directly behind the published information (publisher, date, etc)] and also as examplified as above portraits of the important characters. It helps if you know how to draw... which thankfully I am quite good at.
     
  6. Kaymindless
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    Kaymindless Contributing Member

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    Were those images included with the manuscript or added in once it had already been picked up? I think what Cogito is stating is that they shouldn't be included when you're sending out, but that's not stopping you from requesting they're included during the contractual period if your book does get picked up for an agent or publisher.
     
  7. AlphaOmega
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    AlphaOmega New Member

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    As I'm not the writer, I would not know. But if you have an agent already pitching your work to the publisher then would it not be something - images - that can be worked out during the contracting phase [a sort of conditional agreement].
     
  8. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    yes, of course it could be negotiated at that point... but before then, you should not include any art work with the ms...

    i took your original post and question to be referring to a 'booklet' you intended to either print yourself, or self-publish, which is why i didn't bother going into all that stuff about not including artwork in a ms to be submitted to agents or traditional publishers... but the info/advice about that given by others is valid if the work is to be submitted...
     
  9. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    The submissions editor focuses solely on the writing. Including illustrations at that time is unprofessional. At best, the submissions editor will dump the illustrations in the dust bin. At worst, it will annoy him or her, so you will start out with a less receptive submissions editor.

    Any search for an illustrator will not favor a "package deal". It will be a competitive bid taking into account the reputation, fees, and the quality of samples submitted for consideration. Those samples will be solicited after the acceptance of the manuscript. At the time of the acceptance, you can request to be allowed to submit your samples for consideration, and that consideration will be entirely separate from the contract for the writing.

    The one main exception to this is "celebrity books." These are books sold and marketed on the fame (or infamy) of the celebrity, not the quality of the writing. In such cases, "artwork" by the celebrity will help sell the book even if it is of very amateur quality.
     

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