1. Military_Medic
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    Military_Medic New Member

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    In the interest of being helpful. Research on Military and para- medical matters.

    Discussion in 'Research' started by Military_Medic, May 4, 2012.

    Good morning all. As a firm believer in good research before any story, I thought it may be helpful to some of you if I offer my relevant experience as a tool for anyone that can draw on these experiences.

    I am a serving medic within the Royal Army Medical Corps in the British Army and have recently returned from a six month operational deployment in Afghanistan. I was attached to a front line infantry unit and lived in austere conditions at an isolated check point. All twenty of us lived in the same small compound. The daily cycle of patrolling, cleaning weapons, trying to dry out uniforms and boots and cooking up rations occupies most of our time and there are few luxuries or distractions. In terms of patrolling we were involved in an ongoing series of Operations aimed at disrupting insurgent activity in our AO (Area of Operations). We regularly came under fire from insurgents using small arms, belt fed machine guns and UGL's (Under Slung Grenade Launchers) We returned fire using shallow trenches on the edges of ploughed fields or irrigation ditches as cover.

    I also treated a number of traumatic casualties.

    If I can help, get in touch.
     
  2. Tattat44
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    Tattat44 Member

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    I am writing a story that involves a fair amount of gunfighting. It isn't really one of those techno-thrillers that goes into exorbitant detail about the weapon and caliber and all that, but it still revolves mainly around soldiering and the daily hardships and brutalities that they face.

    If you would like to relate the emotions that go through a person when they are in contact with the enemy, and what effect prolonged combat has on a person's psyche, I would be interested to hear it.
     
  3. P R Crawford
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    P R Crawford Member

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    @Military_Medic

    Welcome to the forums and thank you for your kind offer.

    I'm wondering if you might have read the book On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman - and what your own opinion is of it?

    Vets seem to find it largely accurate, whereas academics tend to dismiss Grossman's research as outdated. (Which is often not a good sign, but in this case...?)
     
  4. Military_Medic
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    Military_Medic New Member

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    Afternoon Tattat44, I will reply via PM once I have some spare time.

    @PR Crawford- No I haven't read it, however I will have a look. Thanks.
     
  5. nzric
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    nzric Active Member

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    Another vote for the one raised by P R Crawford. In particular, what do you think about the reports (Brigadier General S.L.A Marshall) that during WWII only 15-20 percent of soldiers actively fired on the enemy during a combat event, the rest being psychologically reluctant to kill. Later studies said the rate increased to around 95% during Vietnam war, with associated increases in PTSD.

    What's your view on today's likely %'ge rate, and what part of that do you associate with intentional/unintentional de-sensitisation that today's soldiers go through with the tv/movie industry, first-person-shooter gaming and military indoctrination? Do you think that ppl who are conditioned to kill during a war are also conditioned/supported to re-enter society and recover psychologically?
     
  6. Thumpalumpacus
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    Thumpalumpacus Contributing Member

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    Do you plan to use your experiences as a basis for your own work?
     
  7. Prince_Genji
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    Prince_Genji Member

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    Wow, I want to write a story just to get your help with it. :) I'm busy with a different one currently, but if you don't mind I do have a whole slew of questions about things the news seem to focus on less. These are not for a story, they're matters of interest to me in general. I'm american, and I would like to join the army however I suffer from type 2b Von Willebrand's disease; a type of hemophilia and I cannot serve. I'm interested because of how similar this is to my nation's involvement in other conflicts. I'm a bit of a military geek to say the least... I have lots of questions, so please don't feel like I'm forcing you or anything. Please only answer the ones you feel comfortable with. I understand if you do not wish to talk about them.

    What were the differences you perceived among different religions, villages, ethnic groups etc. etc.

    How much of Afghanistan's history and cultures were you briefed on before and during your service?

    If you carried it, what would you say are the L85A2's advantages and disadvantages are in the region you served.

    What was the region you served in like specifically?

    How good were your living conditions compared to the villagers?

    What cultural practices struck out at you?

    What tactics did you use?

    How might they be improved? (if possible)

    What do you think of the overall war strategy?

    Roughly what percentage of the action you saw was defensive?

    How large of a spectrum did villager's reactions to you encompass?

    Did you serve near a large city? If so, then what specific challenges and advantages did that provide?

    Why did you serve?

    Why did you choose to become a medic?


    I know there are a lot of questions here. I hope I'm not being rude.
     
  8. inkdweller
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    inkdweller Member

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    I may be from the U.S., but still, thank very much for your service.
    And also, thank you for your time in sharing with us. I'm sure many will find this very helpful.

    My question to you is about the rare downtime. It's a stressful environment I'm sure, how and when does a soldier cope. What are there relationships with other soldiers, I can only imagine the problems presented by getting close to someone in that environment, and yet there must be a mutual respect too. No doubt there is still times for laughs, depending on where you are. All these emotional hills and turns are what I'm interested in. My story doesn't focus so much on the action of war, but a few higher up individuals, however I still believe for character development a glimpse into the average soldier's life is essential. I don't know how much of the actual war I want to include in my story just yet, where it lies on the maturity level, and I admit I'm a bit afraid to ask too much about the details. If you ever post a memoir or have any stories to recommend though, I would be happy to read them.

    Again, thank you so much! :love:
     

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