1. Maxitoutwriter
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    Maxitoutwriter Member

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    Interesting Discovery About Setting

    Discussion in 'Setting Development' started by Maxitoutwriter, Nov 9, 2012.

    Maybe it is a well known fact to more experienced writers, I don't know, but I discovered that the book I'm writing is so much more fun to write when I like the setting, or when there is at least something interesting/unique about the setting.

    I'm writing a story, and what I've noticed is that I've gone from one interesting setting to the next. Not always my usual method.

    I've picked things that set the setting apart from all others, and boy does it keep the story fun to write. I've enjoyed writing this book from page one, so unlike with my stories in the past--which I usually abandoned before finishing, I do not think that I will have the slightest trouble getting at least the first draft written.

    I don't know if it is any fun to read, but I KNOW it sure has been fun to write. My own imagination is fully active when being this involved.

    I also remember in many of the books in the past that I read, the good ones always portrayed visually stunning settings. J.R.R. Tolkien for example, never had his characters just wandering through a bland forest. He would expand on the world and go into details of the past for that particular forest.

    Some would have a lingering fog, others would have living trees that kill people, others would have murderous, giant spiders and wood elves. Always something interesting about the setting.

    The same goes for the Harry Potter series. There was always something that made it interesting. Instead of just going to a bland school for wizards, they went to Hogwarts, a mysterious castle with too many secrets.

    Excellent setting doesn't just help the reader, it is more interesting for the writer as well.
     
  2. Timewalker
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    Timewalker Member

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    Interesting discovery!

    I think it is so because setting makes you feel like you are in that place. And who doesn't like a peaceful garden with trees blocking the sun, nightingales singinging out for you and the wind chilling you out?

    I, however like it when I make a good character. Perhaps Isaac Asimov was in this category, too!
     
  3. TALLULAH
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    TALLULAH Member

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    My writing is definitely character-driven as well. But Maxitoutwriter makes a good point that setting should play an important part. Something on which I definitely need to work!
     
  4. eclectic1993
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    eclectic1993 Member

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    Hi,
    Several years ago when I began thinking seriously about writing a novel, I spent some creative time reflecting on a particular setting. A big fan of man versus dinosaurs in science fiction, I designed a portion of a the world with its critical components such as climate, people groups, technology, etc.

    Nearly two months ago I committed to spending more serious quality time on this goal. It occurred to me that I had 'no' characters, no conflicts, and no plot. So, I've devoted this entire time developing characters with personalities and back stories. Now that I'm reasonably vested in this endeavor the characters now outweigh the importance I placed on the earlier setting.

    As a mental exercise I like to place my characters individually or together into different settings. For example, I'll teleport my protagonist from ancient times to a spacecraft traveling to Mars, or to the front line of the Civil War. I do give them knowledge relevant to the period so their personalities can be evaluated.

    Regards,
    Chuck
     
  5. Seventh_Soul
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    Seventh_Soul New Member

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    I agree completely with the original statement, because personally, I'm absolutely thrilled when I create a setting that just seems right.

    When not only is the setting beautiful and full of potential in itself, but the characters and plot just seem to click into place as I mold everything together to create the final product. It's an amazing experience as a writer.

    I'm a huge fan of creating entire worlds for my stories, and I definitely recognize the importance of an incredible setting and its wonderful effects on not just the reader, but the writer as well.

    Very good discovery, Max.
     
  6. Elfin
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    Elfin New Member

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    I would add that for me it even comes down to the individual scenes.
    I have a devil of a time sometime writing a good scene if I'm not sure of the setting so I experiment.
    I once wrote the same scene three times, first two settings (in a little vietnamese restaurant, then supper at their place) did NOT work. Finally I started again and set it in the food plaza of a busy mall, click , click things fell into place and the scene almost wrote itself.
    So: yes the right setting is critical, to me anyway...

    My two cents worth....
     
  7. MindTheGap
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    MindTheGap Member

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    I have to agree with the original poster. I think my work is fueled a lot by the characters but I also love to focus on the setting(s) that I am incorporating as well. It's finding those balances that is also a good challenge whilst crafting a new project.
     

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