1. jonnubroth
    Offline

    jonnubroth New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2011
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Introducing The English Language's Newest Punctuation Mark!

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by jonnubroth, Oct 30, 2011.

    Hear ye, Hear ye..

    A test of English for all before the unveiling of the English Language's Newest Punctuation Mark!!


    Question 1: Do you know what the punctation mark "." stands for?

    It is called a period or full stop. Lets try a hard harder question.

    What is the punctation mark "…" called?

    Most people don't get this one, so don't feel bad. But this is known as an Ellipsis, its proper name.

    Last, what is the punctation mark ".." called?

    No one had an answer to that question until now..

    Introducing a "Chev" or ".."

    [​IMG]

    Chev
    (plural Chevi; from the French word Chevalier, meaning Knight or "mounted soldier")

    1 signifies a well-thought out or important statement with the intent of being seen by a large number of people, usually on the internet..

    Example:
    "Not a lot of brains, but that Artichoke had heart.."

    2 In text messaging, it denotes a statement that expects a response..

    Example:
    "I couldn't stop laughing at that terrible joke, haha.."
    response:
    "Thanks :) It just came to me."

    Patent Pending ;) Any questions about it just shoot me a question here or here https://www.facebook.com/2Dots1Chev..

    Also, if you're willing to help change our language forever "Like" it there or up-vote it on Urban Dictionary or just use it some time ;) *shameless plug over*
     
  2. architectus
    Offline

    architectus Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,796
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Ca
    I don't see the point :p << would rather make faces new punctuations:)
     
  3. Timothy Giant
    Offline

    Timothy Giant Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2011
    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Enkhuizen, Netherlands
    Smileys would be better indeed. Though I like this post extremely (if sarcastic).
     
  4. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    makes no sense whatsoever to me... i hope this post was meant to be a 'joke' [though if it was, it went over like a lead balloon, as the oldtimey comics would say]... ;-)
     
  5. jonnubroth
    Offline

    jonnubroth New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2011
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    What don't you get? I was hoping the definition was self explanatory.

    Thank you for showing interest! (if sarcastic..)

    No 'joke' intended whatsoever. I'm honestly doing this and have already done a lot towards my goal. Sorry if it upsets any of you, although a serious thank you because you've been much kinder than other forums :)
     
  6. Arathald
    Offline

    Arathald Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2011
    Messages:
    314
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Seattle
    Sorry to burst your bubble, but artificially invented punctuation marks have an extraordinarily bad track record. In fact, I know of none that is in common use.

    As for your uses:
    Really? If I ever see this "punctuation mark" used in that way, I'm going to think nothing but "what an arrogant <insert favorite swear here>". If a statement is important, it's going to be shared. If it's worthwhile, a lot of people will see it. Otherwise, just no.

    I have not, a single time in my life, had any need to signify that I wanted a response that I couldn't indicate either with an unambiguous statement or a question mark.

    I was hoping that it was a joke. Since you seem to be serious about it, please know that no serious writer, online or otherwise, will likely ever use it. Sorry to be so blunt, but this is how it is.
     
  7. Raki
    Offline

    Raki Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    Messages:
    317
    Likes Received:
    6
    Maybe ...

    3. A typo for the common period (.)

    Kidding aside, I don't see the point either. Well–thought-out and important statements, with or without the intent of being seen by a large number of people, on or off the internet, already have a punctuation mark—the period. In my opinion, it's not the punctuation that should make statements well–thought-out or important, but the choice of words, the voice, tone, and so on. And I also tend to believe that if this wasn't the case, there would be half a dozen or more punctuation marks similar to your Chev coming into existence and use every year. Look at the other punctuation marks: exclamation mark used as early as the 15th Century; question mark as early as the 8th Century; the ellipsis is a younger punctuation mark, but its use has still been around for more than a century. I'm definitely not a professional on the history of punctuation marks or the transformations they've endured over the years, and the above dates were pulled from wikipedia, as reliable as that may be. I'm just saying there is a reason why new punctuation marks aren't cropping up every few years. There's not really a need for them. I think the most recent punctuation marks were patented Nov. 12, 1992, (the "question comma" and "exclamation comma" and I think they tried to get an "interrobang comma" from reading the patent), again pulled from wikipedia, but I'm not certain if they ever caught on (in the US). At least, I haven't seen them in much, if any, writing. In my opinion, these punctuation marks make sense for the places where the question and exlamation marks are working as commas, but I don't think there is any confusion without them. The idea of ending a sentence with two periods looks to me as more of a typo than an actual needed punctuation mark for which the definitions fit that of a period.

    Also, you may find it interesting, but the punctuation mark (..) according to wikipedia is actually a form of an extended ellipsis ... don't ask me about the "extended" part :) ... which says, "Today, extended ellipsis of two, seven, ten, or even dozens of periods have become common constructions in Internet chat rooms and text messages." This particular statement has a source in the references, #7, check it out: Ellipsis.

    And just speaking from personal habit and observations ... it is rare when I see others or myself use punctuation in text messaging (unless the phone does it for me). I used to do it when my phone had an actual, slide-out keyboard on it, but I'm terrible with the touch screens so I just jet through with the letters. Call me the lazy texter :)
     
  8. Trilby
    Offline

    Trilby Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2010
    Messages:
    2,098
    Likes Received:
    69
    Location:
    NE England
    Leave well alone.

    '..' Does not simplify or add anything to English grammar.
     
  9. Protar
    Offline

    Protar Active Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2011
    Messages:
    603
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    UK
    Wasn't sure whether you were being serious (thought it might just be a fun little excercise.) but as you are I have to agree it adds little.. An important statement should stand on its own. If it's important enough then it shouldn't need any denotation. It's a fun little idea but there's really no need for it.
     
  10. jonnubroth
    Offline

    jonnubroth New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2011
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    No bubbles burst here friend. I've done my homework and know that punctuation marks not created with a reason go nowhere. The Greeks created the comma, colon, and period because they needed a way for their actors to know when to take breaks reading scripts.


    Just because people have been doing it for years, doesn't mean it should fall into the same definition of the ellipsis. Languages change constantly. Most people don't even know how to correctly use an ellipsis actually. But you did do some homework, but you missed a couple of unheard of punctuation mark gems.. Like the SarcMark Where the creators tried to charge people to use their "new" mark and it failed miserably. Not to mention there is already a mark to denote sarcasm or rhetorical questions, a backwards question mark. Then there is the Pomma Point "The Pomma Point, half way between period and the exclamation point." Not a bad idea, but totally a joke created by some guy. Soon the "Chev" will be another mark people will never hear about..


    I 100% agree, but now it has a name..


    Excellent use of the Chev! I'm also thinking of this as a fun experiment that will probably go nowhere.
     
  11. cobaltblue
    Offline

    cobaltblue Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2011
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    I'd say the name 'chev' is a bit too close to the term 'chav' look that up in the urban dictionary.
     

Share This Page