1. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    Is Hollywood "Americanizing" the Australian accent?

    Discussion in 'Entertainment' started by Wreybies, Dec 11, 2015.

    It's no secret that Australian actors are enjoying a Golden Era right now in Hollywood. They've always been there, there's nothing new about it, but as of late Hollywood is chockablock with Aussies.

    I've been getting into a little Australian LGBT oriented comedy called Please Like Me. I love this little show. It's sweet, endearing, touching, silly, and the other day I noticed that the younger actors in the show (not all, but most) seemed to be aspiring to an accent that is rather more "American Midwestern" than "BBC Standard" to my ear. Now clearly they are all Australian. NO ONE is saying they are speaking with an American Accent, just that there seems to be an influence that is more American than British as regards the younger actors.* I'm assuming that Australian TV has a sort of flattened, standardized manner of speaking, just as is the case in the UK and in the U.S., which doesn't (for the most part) represent more regional or more "pronounced" accents.

    Is this a thing? Is it just me? Does this get heard on Australian TV? Are these young up-and-commers preparing for a crossover to Hollywood?

    Discuss. :)



    *Josh, the MC of the show (the blond guy) is the standout exception. He has an accent all his own that the other characters often comment upon within the storyline. :)
     
  2. uncephalized
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    uncephalized Active Member

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    Renee Lim has a strong Australian accent that I associate with Sidney (I've never been to Australia so if I'm totally wrong don't murder me). The older man and woman also sounded very Aussie, with the woman sounding more 'posh' British-Aussie and the man more Aussie-Aussie. The other younger folk were not as thick in their speech but I still would say Australia if you asked me where they were from, except as you noted Josh, who sounded... not quite sure what he sounded like. I can see what you mean though; some of their vowels and usage do sound a bit American; that's not really too surprising since we've got global media and the internet and the US is the dominant player--sounds are going to bleed over. Interesting.

    The guy who was telling the story about 'doing a poo' on the driveway sounded Australian but maybe the least strongly out of anyone I heard in the video. I think he'd have an easy time Americanizing his accent if he tried.
     
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  3. Bookster
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    Bookster Banned

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    As the typical insulated American, if I had come upon that video cold, I would have assumed the characters were British at first, and if I played it over might have guessed Australian. The only one who sounded remotely American to me is the dark-haired girl at the dinner table.
     
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  4. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    That's Keegan Joyce. He's got a good bit of stage-work under his belt, holding the honor of having played Oliver for longer than any other actor in the musical stage performance of Oliver. Wonder if that has anything to do with it. :)
     

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