1. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    Is it repetitive?

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by Cacian, Jan 27, 2012.

    turn yourself in and turn yourself to law.
    or
    give yourself up

    which is better?
    1) He has turned in to pressure so he is giving himself up.
    or
    2) He has turned himself in because he has given in to pressure.

    a) to give up : to surrender
    b) to give in: to cease opposition
    and
    c) to turn in : to hand in/to give over
    I find these slightely confusing.
     
  2. THP
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    THP New Member

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    It depends on the context. 'turned in to pressure'? I don't think that makes sense. On the other hand number 2 sounds clunky 'He gave into pressure, so turned him self in' might be a better way of wording it, but again it depends on context.
     
  3. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    if something's been repeated, it's obviously 'repetitive'... the question should be, 'is there a good reason for it to be so?'...

    underlined part makes no sense at all, unless you're saying the person should start to study the law, in which case it's still an awkward phrase...
    either 'turn yourself in' or 'give yourself up' is ok, depending on how the person saying it would speak...

    first part makes no sense... you seem to mean 'he has given in to pressure'...

    that makes sense, but pressure from 'what/whom' needs to be specified...

    those are correct, but 'to give up' can also refer to some thing that is given up... such as 'he gave up his rights to the property'...

    'turn in' has several meanings:

    betray someone to the police [if you don't give up, i'll turn you in]

    go to bed [i'm going to turn in now]

    aim a vehicle, or yourself, if walking, off the road toward a building or parking spot [we turned in at the entrance sign]

    take a found object to authorities or a lost and found dept. [you should turn in the purse you found]

    give a report/homework assignment/whatever to the boss/teacher/etc.[turn in your report before monday]

    a foot/eye that doesn't aim straight [his left foot turns in a bit]

    'hand in' can also have different meanings:

    'hand in your homework before the end of class'

    'he had a hand in causing the disaster'

    'give over' really only means 'hand over' [i think], though i it may be more used in the uk than the us:

    'he will have to give over ownership of the shop'
     
  4. madhoca
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    madhoca Contributing Member Contributor

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    Apart from the incorrect word choice (as mammamaia says) the repeated 'in' is annoying, so it is repetitive, yes. If you must have phrasal verbs, don't have the same preposition,
    E.G:
    He has buckled under pressure from his wife, so he is turning himself in to the police.
    OR
    His wife's pressure has worn him down, so he is turning himself in to the police.
    (if that's what you meant--the sentence is unclear, as the people above have said).
     
  5. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    mamma and madhoca I thank you both for the feeback.
    I looks clearer to me now.
    I tend to get some verbs with prepositions muddled up.
     
  6. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    what about
    He gave in to pressure
    rather
    he gave into pressure
    There is a difference between the two right?
     
  7. Berber
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    Berber Active Member

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    There is a difference. The word "into" is a preposition that suggests movement, entrance, or change of state (such as turning into something). If your prepositional phrase shows one of these, especially if it answers the question where?, then you should use "into." On the other hand, "in to" is an adverb followed by a preposition - two words that just so happen to fall next to each other. "In to" is often, but not always, the equivalent of in order to. For example: He went in to see if he could help - OR - He went in order to see if he could help.

    Now looking at your example, the word "pressure" does not describe movement, entrance, or change of state. Since "into pressure" is a nonsensical prepositional phrase in this context, the correct usage would be: He gave in to pressure.
     

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