1. Ryan Elder
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    Ryan Elder Contributing Member

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    Is their reasons why an undercover cop would work alone in this case?

    Discussion in 'Plot Development' started by Ryan Elder, Jan 25, 2016.

    For my story, I want an undercover cop to work alone. But I am finding the premise difficult to make it work, cause I cannot think of why an undercover cop would. I mean you don't want to send a cop to infiltrate a dangerous criminal organization, without monitoring him, and wanting to keep him safe.

    But I would like the cop to witness things, that no other cop does. Therefore later on, he has trouble getting his superiors to believe certain things about the case. It becomes the crooks word against his. But if he has back up, the other officers will support what he says, and it's easier for superiors to believe more than one cop, telling the same thing, compared to one only, against everyone else.

    Plus since it's a very low budget screenplay, I would like him to work alone, so less actors would needed, if possible.

    Is the concept feasible, or is it just not logical enough, and the police would just want to give the cop back up, that is surveying him, ready to go, in case his cover is blown?
     
  2. BayView
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    BayView Contributing Member Contributor

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    Do you mean he'd work alone always? Like, he'd never check in with his handler or anything? I think that would be hard to explain.

    But if you just have him being alone for the actual undercover part, I think that would make sense - I don't know much about real-world police procedure, but in TV/movie situations, the UC is almost always working alone when he's with the actual criminals. It's hard enough to get one officer in close to the bad guys--quite a bit harder to get more than one. And even if there were two working the same job, it would blow their cover pretty quickly if they insisted on always being together.
     
  3. Ryan Elder
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    Ryan Elder Contributing Member

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    It's not that he has to be together with another one in person. But you think that there would be others in civilian looking cars, parked nearby the meeting places in case something were to go wrong. Basically there in my opening scene, the undercover cop, is having a meeting with some sinister criminals he is making contact with, for the first time.

    However, you think that this would be dangerous and that other cops would want to be waiting a few blocks away, parked in cars, or observing the meeting from for away, out of sight, in case the undercover gets hurt, or it's an ambush.

    It just seems odd to me that the handler would not provide any back up that stays out of sight, or anything like that, and I cannot think of a reason why the handler would not. But I kind of need a reason, if I am to have the undercover cop, witness things, that no other cops that are back up nearby, can see or hear.

    I understand how a cop would not have back up all the time, but during the big sting operation, or during a meeting when you are to meet some dangerous individuals, for some crime discussion, wouldn't there be back up all around, and hidden?
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2016
  4. BayView
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    BayView Contributing Member Contributor

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    I know one guy who works undercover, and when he's working, he's gone. Like, he doesn't go to his own house at the end of the day, he's out all hours with the bikers he's investigating, etc. He's with them day after day, week after week. So there really isn't a chance to have backup nearby all the time. He could get a call in the middle of the night or a knock on his door and he'd be on - not much chance to set things up.

    So have your bad guys just show up at the UC's apartment and tell him to get in the car, or something. No time to plan anything.
     
  5. Ryan Elder
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    Ryan Elder Contributing Member

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    Okay thanks. I guess I just have trouble buying it for some reason. In my story, the main character is going to meet the gang for the first time. However, he is being recruited in a way, in which he does not know who any of the gang members are. They would have to recruit newcomers by social media or something, that is untraceable, in order for the cops to not know who they are, even the undercover officer.

    The gang is also recruiting the newcomer to commit a felony for them in order to prove his worth.

    However, if he tells the superiors that is going to a strange remote location at night to meet a gang in which he has never met any of the members before, not knowing what they will have him do, or do to him... would his superiors just say good luck, and let him out on his own?

    I just don't buy it myself. I mean if the cop disappears after, and the police have to tell the family, the family will ask "Why didn't you give him back up, to see if he would be okay, just in case something were to happen to him?"

    The superiors would then have to say that it's standard protocol, that all undercovers must work alone with no surveillance. The family would then ask, who these gangsters are that made the cop disappear, and the police would then have to tell them, "since he was working alone, we do not have any idea who any of them are".

    It just makes the cops come off as stupid and incompetent to the reader though, doesn't it?
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2016

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