1. JacyFaye
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    JacyFaye New Member

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    is there a stage fright for writers?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by JacyFaye, Oct 21, 2011.

    Is there such a thing as stage fright for writers? Because from the feedback I have been getting, I’ll be honest, I haven’t written anything longer than this in two months and for me that’s pathetic.

    It certainly isn’t writers block. I’ve got more than I could put on paper in that jar of ideas stashed in the filing cabinet in my brain. I’ve written a book, (actually, 2 full books) and about 6 partials I’m working on at random. The two full’s are in a series, a series I’m planning to add a third to at the very least. It’s been read and re-read and read again by my own eyes and many others. Friends colleagues and a few college grads majoring in the literary arts, not just the books but also the queries and synopsis.
    Despite all this, I’ve not gotten more than one request from a charlatan company that promised me the world if only I signed my soul over in blood and faxed it to him right away. Oops. We live, we learn. (No I sent no such fax)
    But, if everyone says great, up to par, all that and more… Why am I still getting nowhere with agents?
    Is it reasonable to find a company that does these reviews and critiquing professionally? And if so, how in tartar sauce does one find a legitimate one?
    I’ve heard the markets running dry, but I see proof to the contrary daily in book stores. I’m certain I’m hitting agents who take the work… And as self doubting as I am I still believe the books are not crap. That it’s as good as and better than some of the books hitting the shelves today. And trust me, I’ve read up to the thousands of them so I don’t think I am completely ignorant. Also, some of the people who’ve read my books could give two cents for my feelings, they’re deadly honest.
    Any thoughts?
     
  2. Nicholas C.
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    Nicholas C. Active Member

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    I'm no published author, so take this FWIW, but I think that breaking into the fiction market has parallels to breaking into almost any other entertainment market. Take music for example. You have to have not only talent and perseverance, but a bit of luck also in a lot of cases. I think the same can be said with fiction.

    But that shouldn't discourage you. We make our own luck in life. Just keep at it :)
     
  3. ChickenFreak
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    ChickenFreak Contributing Member Contributor

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    > The two full’s are in a
    > series, a series I’m planning to add a third to at the very
    > least.

    This may be part of the problem. My understanding is that it's vanishingly rare for a first-time author to sell a series _as_ a series. If the first book of the series doesn't stand entirely on its own as a novel, without needing the rest of the series, that will be a problem. Even if it does, but you're trying to sell it as a series, that may also be a problem. Others who know more will chime in, but I'd suggest doing any revising that may be needed to make the book stand alone, and then consider not even mentioning the "series" fact when sending queries.

    ChickenFreak
     
  4. Jhunter
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    Jhunter Mmm, bacon. Contributor

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    Harry Potter got denied a dozen times before someone bought it. Just keep sending your work out.
     
  5. JacyFaye
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    JacyFaye New Member

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    Well I thank you for your help. But I should have noted, I've read that about series so I actually dont mention book two or three at all. If they hook, then I inform them. "Heh, oh by the way, got a couple more for ya's"
     
  6. Banzai
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    Banzai One-time Mod, but on the road to recovery Contributor

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    As I mentioned in your other thread, publishers' decisions are business (and therefore risk) based. Taking on a series is more of a risk than a standalone novel, so therefore the odds are better that they will take on a standalone novel. There are no further commitments. If it crashes and burns, then that's the end of it.

    But, if the first book in your series is capable of standing on its own (i.e. it is a complete story in its own right, not ending on a cliffhanger), then it's entirely possible (likely, even) that if it is a success then the publisher would be very keen to publish sequels.
     

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