1. Duchess-Yukine-Suoh
    Offline

    Duchess-Yukine-Suoh Girl #21 Contributor

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2013
    Messages:
    2,319
    Likes Received:
    743
    Location:
    Music Room #3

    Is "to-day" correct?

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by Duchess-Yukine-Suoh, Oct 26, 2013.

    I've seen many classic books (such as Dickens) have to-day instead of today. Is that still in correct use now?
     
  2. thirdwind
    Offline

    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Messages:
    7,351
    Likes Received:
    2,891
    Location:
    Boston
    It's archaic. Stick to "today."
     
  3. Duchess-Yukine-Suoh
    Offline

    Duchess-Yukine-Suoh Girl #21 Contributor

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2013
    Messages:
    2,319
    Likes Received:
    743
    Location:
    Music Room #3
    M'kay, thanks! :)
     
  4. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    for future reference, you can get a quicker answer to either-or questions by simply googling the two words in " " with 'vs' or 'or' between them... like this: "to-day vs today"
     
  5. digitig
    Offline

    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2010
    Messages:
    2,502
    Likes Received:
    79
    Location:
    Orpington, Bromley, United Kingdom, United Kingdom
    In fairness to the original questioner, "to-day" used to be the norm, and it's not always easy to tell whether a shift in usage is considered a change in the language or increasing frequency of a blunder.

    For what it's worth, it's a standard pattern of development in English for two separate words to become hyphenated and then to become a single word. "Today" is far enough through that progression for anything else to be archaic, but it's not at all unusual to find combinations that are still part-way (or is that partway? Part way?) through the transition, in which case you can expect arguments in which neither side is right and neither side is wrong.
     

Share This Page