1. Haribol Acharya
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    Haribol Acharya Member

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    Is writing more creative than speaking?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Haribol Acharya, Jul 30, 2008.

    All that demands of you as a writer is wordplay or punning. Once you come upon this, it necessitates of you is a nice arrangement of words and synthesized sentence structures.

    I do not say writing is more creative or inventive. Speaking has an art too, and of course it is tougher but writing has an edge over speaking or delivering discourses in that writing can be edited and enhanced in due course.

    I do not admit that discourses are less artistic, emphatic or shallower. No. if we listen to some great orators orating we find them highly moving, yet it writing that survives discoursing.

    Indeed one needs more skills and promptness and quickness of mind in discoursing in point of fact. It is instants and prompt. Yet orators could not immortalize the way writers could in the course of time.

    There were great orators in the past but history did not chronicle them the way they chronicled the writers.
     
  2. penhobby
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    penhobby Contributing Member

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    No they were chronicled quite well; perhaps you just didn’t look in right place.
    Google ‘great orators of the past’
    Here’s to name just a few and I am certain others on the forum can provide even more. Do not underestimate the power of the spoken word, which incidentally started out written.
    Martin Luther King Jr.
    John F. Kennedy
    Winston Churchill
    M K Gandhi
     
  3. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    I think that they are related art forms. As you mention, writing has the added benefit that one can review and enhance the content at any time. Speech (not giving a speech, which is also written beforehand, but actual, real time conversation) can be very much an art as well. You have to play by ear, and off the cuff. In my culture (Spanish,) we have a wonderfully humorous daily use of metaphor and imagery that even have special words to describe those who are masters of the art. I think that improving one’s capacity for fluid and artful daily discourse can have synergistic effect on one’s writing.
     
  4. J Done
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    J Done Member

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    I don't really understand how you mean this; but when you write a speech, you do exactly that.. write it. So everything you speak has to be written.

    Correct me if I've misunderstood this please.
     
  5. Scribe Rewan
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    Scribe Rewan Contributing Member

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    I assume he means spontaneous speech. As in, talking with your friends for example. In which case I'd say that speaking is just as creative. Although I've just finished college, I used to sit on a table of about 10, all of whom are very funny idividuals, very sarcastic, and very witty. Our conversations were always very quick fire, with every phrase being twisted into a joke, etc etc.. My media lecturer even commented on the remarkable pace at which our conversations went. So I think that speaking is just as creative if writing, maybe more so, as with writing you hvae to option to edit and refine, as someone has already said, and yet you cannot easily take bad what you said, especially if it's a joke that doesn't work!
     
  6. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    As a member of Toastmasters as well as here, I deal with both oral and written communication. Both forms require creativity, and there is certainly overlap, but there are wide differences also.

    In oration, you convey emotion and power primarily through your body language, facial expression (including the use of eye contact), and vocal variety. The wording provides only around 10, possibly 20 percent of your message.

    In writing, you don't have the somatic and verbal cues. Everything must be carried in the written word. However, you are not constrained as tightly by time. The skill in words is what turns them into sounds and images in the reader's consciousness.

    The luxury of time is no small factor. In oration, you must keep the flow at just the right rate to stimulate the listeners without overwhelming them. Therefore you must use the words and phrases economically, and make good use of the vonverbal elements to carry the bulk of the message.

    Indeed, the skills are complementary, but each form also has unique qualities that the other cannot readily reproduce.
     
  7. TwinPanther13
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    TwinPanther13 Contributing Member

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    Both are equally artistic. Speech has that bonus of inflection, and tone, and volume that writting lacks. Simple sentences can have there meanings changed quite a bit depending on the voice. Writting has the benefit of being able to go into detail to explain the context of words and sentences. There is just more time. I think trials are the best source of speech battles. Despite what the tv says there are no suprise witnesses. Prosecution and Defense all no witnesses and evidence available. A lot of times it comes down to who is the best Orator and is the most convincing with speech in trials. Written word can not be stilled though, especially today with internet and blogs all around. I also believe it takes a special person to speak well and effectively. it is not a talent all have
     
  8. NaCl
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    NaCl Contributing Member Contributor

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    Which is "more" creative . . . painting with acrylics or sketching with pastel chalks?

    Which is "more" important to your car, the engine or the tires?

    My point is these things are not independent entities. They are equally important to the overall application. In this instance, speech versus the written word, they are allied elements under the heading of communication skills. Neither is "most" important, or perhaps I shjould say EACH is "most" important, depending on the application.

    For example, if you are stranded on a desert island and you found a bottle with a good cork in it. Are you going to shout for help into the bottle, replace the cork and throw it into the sea? Maybe, you should write a message begging for help instead? Another analogy: You're trapped behind a wall of flames in a burning building. You can hear firemen on the opposite side of the fire, but they don't know you're so close and waiting for rescue. Will you (A) write a note to them and throw it through the fire to the other side? Or, (B) yell like Hell?

    As far as the treatment by "history" of great orators versus great writers, I would reference Cog's point of view. Those "great" orators employed skills that far transcended written word. Cadence of speech, intonation, eye contact, emphasis of syllables . . . none of this is captured in written form required by history.

    On the other hand, recordings by modern great orators carry much of the power of the original live speech. "I have a dream." Martin Luther King. "Ask not, what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country." JFK. Who hasn't heard those famous words? "We have nothing to fear, but fear itself." Another famous and powerful recording. With the advent of modern digital recording, I believe today's "great" orators will still be considered powerful speakers many centuries in the future.

    Just my $.02
     
  9. CDRW
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    CDRW Contributing Member Contributor

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    ...No.
     
  10. Ungood
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    Ungood Contributing Member

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    sadly - again this post did not make much sense and as such I can not aptly respond to it as I am not sure the intention of the OP.
     
  11. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    it's clear that the op's birth tongue is something other than english, so the wording is a bit odd...
     
  12. Ungood
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    Ungood Contributing Member

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    I strongly disagree, his grasp of the English language is strong, giving indication that it is his primary language, it is just so confounding what he saying that I am confused by it.
     
  13. tehuti88
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    tehuti88 Contributing Member

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    I don't think either is necessarily "more" creative than the other, if the speaker/writer is being truly...well, creative. If anything a good orator has to be MORE creative and fluent than a writer because they have to get their words just right the first time, whereas like you said a writer can go back and edit. (Please take note I'm speaking of speeches that aren't written out first. Written speeches that are then performed are just a form of writing.)

    Like was mentioned earlier on, I don't think you looked deeply enough for good orators in history. There are lots of them, and oftentimes their great speeches (including the ones that weren't written out ahead of time) are remembered far longer than books.

    I mentioned storytelling as an ancient art form in my response to your other post on the future of writers; writing probably came about because of people who were massively creative in speaking. Some people still don't need to rely on writing to get their stories across in a creative manner; they remember them in their heads, and embellish them with each telling, sometimes making things up as they go along, with no benefit of an eraser or backspace key. That's true talent.
     
  14. draupnir
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    draupnir Member

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    Speech is surely a lot more personal than text - it's not "shallower" - and it can be coloured a lot more by your body language and accent and emphasis.
    Communicating through text, with the sender of the message not present, it is harder to get an original view across and the door is opened for misinterpretations and ambiguities.
    In that sense, you can 'read more into' writing I think!

    If you're wondering which is more creative though, what do you mean by that word?
    If you mean inventive or experimental, then nothing could be more inventive than spontaneous speech, perhaps.
    But if you're talking about being imaginative and 'different' from the norm, text will allow you to break rules, and you can take more liberties.

    Bringing orators into it confuses the issue, because a lot of great speeches have been written out/planned in text, so it's not spontaneous (although it's obviously still a lot more personal).

    I ranted all that off the top of my head, hope someone agrees with anything there.
    By the way, if you're interested in speech vs text, read W S Graham, it's one of his main preoccupations!
     
  15. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    well, he is from [or lives in] nepal... and his name is nepalese... and his use of big, fancy words is so often 'off' that i couldn't say his grasp of english is strong enough to write coherently, which is why it's so confounding and confusing...
     
  16. Haribol Acharya
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    Haribol Acharya Member

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    Yes I am from Nepal. English is not my birth language. I learned it later in life. Even in our school there was no encouraging environment for learning and honing the skills of English. I used to write prolifically in Nepali. I learned Sanskrit also moderately. However, I thought it is only through English that I could go across wider ranges or bigger audiences or readerships. Despite having no favorable or encouraging environment I too to English through books, primarily books of stories, histories, philosophies and theologies. I had never got an opportunity to converse in English. In defiance of everything I got hooked to learning it thru books and TV channels. Now through the internet I come across many readers and writers. I have still difficulties in using or applying articles, appropriate prepositions while writing. I write on several forums and I get suggestions from people that help me to hone my skills in English.

    You may think I am a snob considering my obsession with English notwithstanding the fact that I am a Nepali and this is my second language. Of course I am obsessed and love the English language. But it is not for the reason that I hate Nepali. I adore it. But still I do not choose to be confined within a national bopundary or within narrow linguistic domains. I believe in universalism, thinking that I have to transcend all these barriers to go forward to people across political and geographical frontiers. Maybe one day you may not find me poor at English. I may need at least a decade or so to emerge as a writer in English. I am just a beginner now. I do not claim my authority over the English language. I have miles to go. But if I am able to put across my ideas cleverly and precisely I will be more than happy.
     
  17. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    It's a decent start, despite how some may have responded. The difficulty comes largely from factors which are not entirely language dependent.

    I won't pick out specific phrases and sentences, because that would be a review, and that's not allowed in this part of the site. :)

    Try to make each sentence a single statement. Each paragraph should be structured around a key sentence, usually the first one, and should expand upon it and reinforce it.

    When you are stating a position on a topic, negin with a simple statement of that position in an introductory paragraph. The following statemenst shouls support your statement, and the final paragraph should summarize your position once more.

    Simple declarative sentences with active verbs are the strongest.

    You have a good grasp of English words, and if you better structure the way you combine them, you will be much clearer.

    Why not introduce yourself in New Member Introductions? You may find out more about the site and the people who use it, while we start to get to know you.
     
  18. WAN73D
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    WAN73D Member

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    Writing is speaking on paper as far as I'm concerned. Either way, it's your voice.
     

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