1. Gorrigan
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    Gorrigan New Member

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    I've lost my writing mojo!

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Gorrigan, Aug 4, 2010.

    Hi,

    I've recently had a major busy time in my life and didn't have as much time for writing as I would have liked. Now that I have time for writing again I find that I've lost my writing mojo. Or, more than likely, I've got writers block. My brain just won't function like it has been doing. I've tried a few exercises to get the juices flowing again but they're not working.

    Does anyone have any ideas on how I can get my mojo back?

    Thanks
     
  2. Banzai
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    Banzai One-time Mod, but on the road to recovery Contributor

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    Read.

    Dig out a decent book, read it, see if it inspires you. If not, read a different book.

    Other than that, just go for walks, try to do things not writer-y. Often I find that just watching TV, playing X-Box, or whatever, clears my mind, and inspiration strikes me when I'm not looking for it. Like trying to find your car keys.
     
  3. Zane
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    Zane Contributing Member

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    Yes I agree with Banzai.

    Just forget about writing for a bit, and go out with your friends, and have fun.

    By being with your friends, the things you do with them, can even inspire you to write similar moments on your´res book story. :)

    You´ll see.
    I´ve also been busy this weekend and wrote absolutely nothing, and i´m still a bit "without ideas".
    I also think sometimes people adress it as "writer´s block", when sometimes "at least in my case" it´s actually about a bit of lazyness, to just sit and write and then review. Even though I love reading/writing, If I stop doing it for 1/2 or more days, I always feel that lazyness, on getting back with it again.
     
  4. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Maybe writing just isn't that important to you. Other things are higher on your priority list.

    Examine your priorities.
     
  5. Gorrigan
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    Gorrigan New Member

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    Well it was my best friends wedding so that is very very important to me. Writing is also very important to me and I feel perturbed that you would think it isn't.

    Thank you all for your suggestions. I'll give them a try and see what happens.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. JessaNova
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    JessaNova Senior Member

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    Try to expand your mind. Determine what makes it kick...

    I usually just let my mind keep talking and just speak what it's saying to me. If I have an opinion on something, I'll think about it... and just say the words. If I'm feeling something, I just talk outloud to myself about it and find something appealing to me. I believe that's what a true poetic mind is...
     
  7. BlueWolf
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    BlueWolf Banned

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    If writing is one of your main priorities, and important to you (contrary to what has been suggested), then do not worry about a thing, it will come back; we all experience at one time or another something along those lines.

    Just don't try to force it, and let it come back naturally. Do what has been suggested by Banzai, Zane and JessaNova.
     
  8. minstrel
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    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

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    Get a map of the world. Cover your eyes and put your finger down on it, thus selecting a country at random. Read the Wikipedia entry about that country. Then read a random poem by John Donne or Emily Dickinson. Quickly write down the first sentence that comes into your head. Read this sentence ten times.

    Then put it through the paper shredder and forget about it. Write about anything - ANYTHING - but that!
     
  9. Shinn
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    Shinn Banned

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    Do anything other than writing, as the other members have suggested here. And personally, I play video games and inspiration for a scene might hit me when I'm chasing down terrorists or leading the police on a high speed chase. My writing mojo often comes back gradually after maybe a day or two.
     
  10. Taylee91
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    Taylee91 Carpe Diem Contributor

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    Try listening to some soothing music. That seems to help me unwind my writing nerves. Also try to find some writing prompts on the internet. They're a quick way to jumpstart your brain into writing mode again.
     
  11. JessaNova
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    JessaNova Senior Member

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    This one made me laugh a bit. Ha, good response. :p
     
  12. Sang Hee
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    Sang Hee Contributing Member

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    When this happen to me I just try to write whatever, not in particular a project I'd want to make at the time. Then it picks up the speed for me to move onto something cooler or more important.
    Also inspiration helps. I read a lot of books, comic books, watch movies, listen to music, travel, etc. I really feel sorry for you in a good way and hope you'll get back to doing what feels good for you.
     
  13. HeinleinFan
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    HeinleinFan Banned

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    Huh. For me, I can't go from reading or web surfing straight to a cold story. Or, well, I can, but I prefer not.

    I would wait until I've been doing something else for a while, and am alert but not in a book-reading mood. (Writing early in the morning or soon after work helps; writing after a nap also works.) Then I re-read what I have. If I remember where I wanted to go, fine. I start writing.

    If I don't remember -- and this happens pretty often, as I tend to come up with new ideas while still working on my other project, so I jot down a couple paragraphs and then finish my first story -- I sit back and think about it. I don't let myself leave the computer or the writing booklet for ten or fifteen minutes. This is an actual example:

    "Okay, I wrote a paragraph about a guy with a spirit attached to his soul. He's a soldier, and he is being pursued by the enemy, and he expects to die soon. I know a prophecy was involved somewhere." *Thinks* "Yeah, no, I have no idea what the heck I was going to do with that. But! What if the soldiers are from a society where prophecy is used all the time, so you could find out when each soldier was going to die, and could take some of the long-lived-ones and use them as messengers or spies because you knew they would survive?"

    New story. Different take on the idea I originally had -- I still don't know what it was, but that wasn't it -- but I can still turn it into a neat tale or two, send it off to F&SF or Daily Science Fiction and see if they bite.

    Remember, if you can come up with any kind of useful, coherent plot you will enjoy writing, even if you've lost the original spark, you can finish the story and come up with a good product. And even if it never ends up quite as good as the "uninterrupted original version" might have been, it is good practice both in terms of simple writing, and good practice for showing any nagging doubts that you can beat writer's block when you have to.
     

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