1. deadrats
    Offline

    deadrats Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2016
    Messages:
    633
    Likes Received:
    292

    jobs

    Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by deadrats, Sep 18, 2016.

    Would you rather work for a small publisher of scholarly books or a literary journal? The job at for the publisher mostly would be copyediting along with some general duties of an editorial assistant. The lit. journal mostly would be reading submissions. Both of these would be part time with a lot of flexibility. I'm not really sure. Just sort of thinking about my options. My writing would still be my main focus, but I'm finding it a little lonely to do nothing but write in a room by myself all the time.
     
  2. BayView
    Offline

    BayView Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2014
    Messages:
    5,624
    Likes Received:
    5,108
    Literary journals is more your thing, right? Might make some contacts, get some ideas of what's out there... seems like it would be more directly related to your own goals.

    But maybe you'd rather have a break from those goals. Do something else with your brain?

    I wouldn't want either job, myself--not my thing at all. But for you...?
     
    deadrats likes this.
  3. Earp
    Offline

    Earp Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2016
    Messages:
    219
    Likes Received:
    179
    I'd agree with @BayView. If you can't decide between the two on the merits of the jobs, pick the one that would seem to offer the best opportunity to make contacts who may be able to help you get the job you want.
     
    deadrats likes this.
  4. TWErvin2
    Offline

    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
    Messages:
    2,528
    Likes Received:
    561
    Location:
    Ohio, USA
    Reading submissions can become drudgery if that's all you do for the publisher. I've read slush pile submissions for a magazine. If it weren't for the occasional editing and other tasks, I wouldn't have continued for the several years I did.

    See, the slush pile never ends, which I guess is job security ;) And yes, you will find gems...but you will find a lot of sloppy mud too. Still, there are worse jobs I've held.
     
    deadrats likes this.
  5. deadrats
    Offline

    deadrats Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2016
    Messages:
    633
    Likes Received:
    292
    Thanks for your thoughts on this, guys. I think I'm going to hold off a little. I'm not really looking to move up any sort of career ladder other than with my creative writing. The idea behind taking either of these positions is to feel more a part of something. If I can't be this great, successful writer, I still want to be a pert of great writing. And in these kind of things I have experience and some contacts. But for some reason I just don't feel excited about my possible opportunities at the moment. I have worked these jobs before, but when I think about doing it again, I feel exhausted, and I haven't even updated my resume.
     
  6. SethLoki
    Offline

    SethLoki Unemployed Autodidact Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2011
    Messages:
    590
    Likes Received:
    474
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    @TWErvin2

    Notwithstanding I've likely been a slice of slush in such piles; can I ask that if you make your judgement call early—do you then 'skim read' with the hope for improvement in the offering? Or dismiss it in the interests of time saving and quickly move on in your gem hunt?
     
  7. deadrats
    Offline

    deadrats Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2016
    Messages:
    633
    Likes Received:
    292
    I read slush for a number of years. You can usually tell pretty quickly if it's a definite no. And many stories that do not show much potential very early on don't get read to the end.I think you can usually tell by the end of the second page if a piece is just not going to work for that publication. But I always went into it looking for a good story. My goal was never to rush through and reject things. I was looking for the good stuff, and sometimes I found it. I did have a tendency to read on in many cases. If I made it to the end and wasn't going to pass the story up, I would usually write a personal rejection.
     
  8. Shadowfax
    Offline

    Shadowfax Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2014
    Messages:
    2,505
    Likes Received:
    1,339
    I've done some slush reading for an SF magazine.

    I (almost) always read it all; it's a short story for chrissake! The only exception (and I gave it a good go!) was one submission where the SPaG was so obviously of a non-English speaker, and the story was told at the level of a five-year old. And I will give general feedback of why I advised rejection.
     
  9. deadrats
    Offline

    deadrats Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2016
    Messages:
    633
    Likes Received:
    292
    Hey, I wasn't being lazy when it comes to not reading a whole story. The journals I have read submissions for got a real lot and many of them lacked the quality of writing we would publish. I don't know how many submissions you had to read or what sort of instructions you were given, but this is how things worked where I was.
     
  10. SethLoki
    Offline

    SethLoki Unemployed Autodidact Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2011
    Messages:
    590
    Likes Received:
    474
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    Reason I asked is I sent in a submission once that was front loaded with cheesy writing in order to evoke the gag reflex towards a character's monologue. The bit that had the hook on which to bite, I told myself upon rejection, went unread. I was too proud to go and ask why it wasn't considered—much preferring my own spin (more fool them for non-perseverance) on the situation at that sensitive time.
     
  11. Shadowfax
    Offline

    Shadowfax Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2014
    Messages:
    2,505
    Likes Received:
    1,339
    Sorry, I hadn't read your post when I responded (you posted just 3 minutes before me) to @TWErvin2 's post.
     
  12. deadrats
    Offline

    deadrats Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2016
    Messages:
    633
    Likes Received:
    292
    They read enough to make a decision on your writing. I wouldn't say those editors or readers were being foolish. I'm guessing they were looking for something else and not cheesy writing.
     
  13. deadrats
    Offline

    deadrats Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2016
    Messages:
    633
    Likes Received:
    292
    No worries.
     
  14. TWErvin2
    Offline

    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
    Messages:
    2,528
    Likes Received:
    561
    Location:
    Ohio, USA
    Generally we (editors) worked to finish the story, even if it was evident early on that it wasn't going to work. We were one of the few that offered comments/suggestions related to why the story didn't work for us. Normally it was a two strikes, and if a tie, a third reader would give the thumbs up or down for final consideration for publication.

    The thing is, if a story isn't working early on...what will the readers of the magazine do? Skip it once they start and are disappointed. Most don't continue on hoping for a story to improve.

    I will say that many writers appreciated comments on their work, but we often got some nasty blow back from writers as well. Most magazines stop when they make their decision (no), and that would've been easier and faster, but we were a magazine that only offered 1/2 penny per word, and wanted to offer something additional to those willing to submit their work to us.
     
  15. SethLoki
    Offline

    SethLoki Unemployed Autodidact Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2011
    Messages:
    590
    Likes Received:
    474
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    I will say you're dead right there. From this side; firing some writing off to a prospective publisher that turns out instead to be into a void, leaves one with the mixed feelings of uncertainty/disheartenment. Far better to know why or what caused the rejection for the sake of progression.

    Still form this side; writers should have a bit of dignity and not protest one jot if they're rejected. Unbecoming.

    Thanks for the insight BTW.
     

Share This Page