1. Powka
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    Powka New Member

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    Last year - which subject?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Powka, Jan 8, 2013.

    Hello there,

    I know this might not be the best forum to ask about this, but I couldn't find a more appropriate one.

    I'm on my last year of studies and have to complete 120 credits. I've chosen Advanced Creative Writing for 60 credits, and am not sure what else to choose that would benefit my future writing. I understand that people probably won't know much about the course and a lot here depends the way you look at it and what are one's interests and styles, but I thought I'll give it a shot and ask what everybody thinks about these ones listed below and maybe express their opinion what would they choose, etc. Thanks a bunch!!

    I've narrowed it down to these ones:
    - 20th century literature: texts and debates (Gain a new appreciation and understanding of great twentieth-century literature - both the writing itself and the excitement and controversy it caused in its own time)
    - Shakespeare: text and performance (Develop your knowledge of the range and variety of Shakespeare's dramatic work, as well as how it has been perceived critically since it was written)
    - The nineteenth-century novel (Novels of this period were particularly engaged with the events, beliefs and attitudes of their time. This course encourages you to enjoy and understand them.)
    - Renaissance art reconsidered (Renaissance art wasn't just confined to Italy, as traditional courses would have it... discover new social, geographical and subject areas where its influence was felt)
    - The art of English (Explore creativity in the English language: from everyday use (conversation, children's language, correspondence, online chat) to 'high culture' literary language and contemporary media texts)
    - Art of the twentieth century (Explore the key media, artists, movements which have revolutionised the concept and practice of art in modern times - from painting and sculpture to performance art)
    - English grammar in context (Understand how English 'works' in a wide range of contexts, including the media, academic writing and everyday conversation, on this practical and intellectually stimulating course.)
    - Children's literature (A broad introduction to the vibrant field of children's literature studies encompassing eighteenth-century fairy tales to examples of contemporary fiction illustrating current trends.)
     
  2. chicagoliz
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    chicagoliz Contributing Member Contributor

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    It doesn't really matter what I would choose. What would most benefit you is the one you find most interesting. From a really basic, no-nonsense perspective, I'd say the English grammar in context course would be most beneficial, although not necessarily the most interesting or thought-provoking, which has it's own merits as far as an influence on your writing. Personally, I think the 20th C lit class sounds most interesting, but that's just what appeals to me. You should pick the one you think you will enjoy the most.
     
  3. blenderpie
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    blenderpie Member

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    I've taken a class that sounds like the art of English and it was a really really great class. However, I can't speak for that course at your school. I think any of them would benefit your writing, since reading and discussion improves writing.
     
  4. Powka
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    Powka New Member

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    That is precisely what I thought! I was thinking that "technically", the most beneficial and challenging might be the English in Context course, but I'm mostly interested in 20th Century Literature and feel that it might be the most enjoyable out of the bunch. Thanks for your response.

    I'm also a little drawn to The Art of English, but can't really understand what it really is about...
     
  5. Powka
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    Powka New Member

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    Oh, cool! Would you say it has benefited your writing in some way?
     
  6. blenderpie
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    I suppose? It's such and interesting look at the language. I could say that it made me more aware of word choice, especially in dialogue.
     
  7. Powka
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    Powka New Member

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    Sounds great! I'll look into this one.
     
  8. radnommandess
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    radnommandess Member

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    If it was me I would go for the art of english. Grammar will be learned which ever course you take. The art of english offers most scope for developing creativity and for me sounds most interesting to a creative mind. Much though it is necessary grammar is boring as fcuk and if you want the mark you have to be able to engage positively in what you are doing.
     
  9. Powka
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    Powka New Member

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    Sounds like a solid reasoning to me, thanks! I was leaning towards 20th Century Novel, but a lot of people are actually supporting The Art of English with valuable arguments, so I think I might go for this one.
     
  10. minstrel
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    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

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    I would choose the art of English course, but that's because it's a major interest for me. I love beautiful prose.

    I wish there was a really good history or geography course on the list, or a philosophy survey course. While it's important to know how to use language, it's probably more important to have something to write about, and courses that help you understand the way the world is and why it is that way can only help a writer.
     
  11. thirdwind
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    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

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    It depends on what sort of stuff you want to write. Studying novels is a good way to learn what makes a good novel (and what doesn't). If you want to write children's books, take the children's literature class. For creative writing, I would say the class on the art of English would probably help the most, but this is just based on the description you gave.

    Given the choice, I would pick 20th century novels, but that's only because I like reading and discussing (and eventually writing) novels.
     

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