1. Steerpike
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    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

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    Latin speakers...

    Discussion in 'Research' started by Steerpike, Apr 12, 2016.

    Gallia est omnia divisia in parties tres.

    Something about Gaul divided. Anyone know the translation, and also where it comes from and what the significance is?

    I'm on my phone and the search engine is just spinning or I'd look it up :)
     
  2. Alejandro89
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    Alejandro89 Member

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    I think, so dont quote me, it means: Galia as a whole is divided in three parts.
    I suck at latin. Also, I think it maybe be from cesar's war diaries.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2016
  3. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    Slight correction:

    Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres.


    Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres, quarum unam incolunt Belgae, aliam Aquitani, tertiam qui ipsorum lingua Celtae, nostra Galli appellantur. Hi omnes lingua, institutis, legibus inter se differunt. ...

    All Gaul is divided into three parts, one of which the Belgae inhabit, the Aquitani another, those who in their own language are called Celts, in our Gauls, the third. All these differ from each other in language, customs and laws. ...

    http://www.sacred-texts.com/cla/jcsr/dbg1.htm
     
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  4. Steerpike
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    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

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    Thanks guys. Geez...I really should have seen "tres" as three. For some reason, I was trying to figure that word out based on French :rofl:

    Now to figure out what Shirley Jackson meant. It's a very short story of hers. A man at a dinner party, a little drunk, leaves the partiers to go to the kitchen. He encounters his host's teenaged daughter and she talks about how the world has no future and the older generation screwed it up (written during the time of the nuclear scares). She points out that she nevertheless does her homework every night. She's reading Caesar. The drunk is a bit annoyed with her and stumbles back to the party where he encounters the host and says he met her daughter and she's doing homework. The father says oh yes and recites that Latin phrase. Was trying to determine how it fits in.

    There are three "parties" in the household. The party goers, the teenaged daughter, and the drunk who fits in with neither....
     
  5. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    Hm.... Interesting. My take would probably have been on the past, present, future dynamic present in the teenage daughter's conversation. Especially since, as you mention, the story was written during the time of the Big Red Button, but I can see your take as well. It may be a story of 3's. :)
     
  6. Lew
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    Lew Contributing Member Contributor

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    A very common phrase even among those who don't know Latin. Just a casual phrase, "Yes I know she is studying Latin, see I know a phrase or two myself." I have heard people do this, or done it myself, many times.
     
  7. Steerpike
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    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

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    Knowing Shirley Jackson's work, I think there is more significance to it in the story.
     
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  8. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    I certainly agree. I just finished reading it. :) Jinkies, the semicolons! :ohno: So - many - semicolons for such a short story. :wtf:

    Regardless, I now feel that we are both correct in our previous conversation on the story. It's very much about divisions and separations. I think the bit of Latin, common and well known as it may be, is purposefully chosen.
     
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  9. Steerpike
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    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

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    She likes her semi-colons. Ever read The Haunting of Hill House or We Have Always Lived in the Castle? Both excellent!
     

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