1. navyypurple
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    navyypurple Member

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    Let's Cook!

    Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by navyypurple, Oct 14, 2010.

    I am on my way to my local Farmer's Market later this afternoon, and seeing as though I am totally obsessed with seasonal and local food scenes, thought it might be cool to hear from some others for once.

    Please share with me your favorite sights, sounds, smells, etc. of your local market. Also, if you have any favorite recipes and/or cooking stories, let's have 'em!
     
  2. navyypurple
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    navyypurple Member

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    I'll start! My partner requested wild-rice and polenta burgers for dinner. At our tiny market, I will be looking for any last of the season bell peppers and wild mushrooms, which they had last week. *fingers crossed* I will probably also seek out the lady who sells those great tangy yellow tomatoes. I have some fingerling potatoes and sweet carrots left over from last week, which I may roast with shallots as a side dish. YUM!
     
  3. Steerpike
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    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

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    I make carnitas, which I love to eat. I sometimes make the corn tortillas myself, though buying good ones is almost as good. Throw some good quality pork ribs (boneless is what I use) into a slow cooker and add cilantro, garlic, salt and pepper, and maybe some lime juice to taste. Sometimes I add tomatillos as well. Let it cook all day until the meat just falls apart. Then you just take your warm, fresh tortilla, add the pork, top with your cheese of choice, fresh cilantro, and salsa verde. You can even toss some avocado slices on top if you like. It's excellent! And it doesn't cost a lot to make, either.
     
  4. LordKyleOfEarth
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    LordKyleOfEarth Contributing Member Contributor

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    I don't like the yellow tomatoes at all. Too sweet for my tastes (I love the acidic flavor of deep red varieties).

    I spotted a few tuna's on some cacti this morning. I may have to make more jelly (or beer) while they are still good.
     
  5. w176
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    w176 Contributing Member Contributor

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    I make gravlax (graved salmon) a tradeitional scandinaivan way to prepare fish. And i
    I would recommend it to all fish lovers and especially sushi lovers.

    [​IMG]

    You take pine fresh salmon, freeze it a day or two make sure to kill any bacteria or parasites is killed. (This is not an issue really. In a population of 20 millions in Scandinavia food poisoning from freshly prepared gravlax is practically unheard of, unless it spoiled to long in in the heat like any other kind of food. Raw fish used in sushi for example don't use the extra caution of freezing the fish first.)

    You let the salmon thaw then you cover it with a thick layer of salt, sugar, and fresh dill weed (and I seen some non traditional variation using other herbs) and possible some pepper and place it in a plastic bag or wrap it plastic wrap.

    Then you place it in the refrigiator for at least 2 days. The longer you do it the more the flavors will intesify. Then you just take it out, just wah or scrape away the spices covering the fish.

    Then you cut it in thin slices. No cooking. It meant to be raw.

    The traditional way ro eat is on bread, or with potatos, but it is a fantastic inridient for everything to salads, to serve with pasta or to use in sushi. (And if you really want to you can fry the thin slices for an -very- salty and tasty fish that also goes wonderfully with pasta) Gravlax keeps for about a week.

    Here is a good recipe: http://www.cookingforengineers.com/recipe/132/Gravlax
     
  6. Pallas
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    Pallas Contributing Member Contributor

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    I have seen several farmer markets around but I do not usually buy anything besides fruits. I think the most notable in nyc is the one in Union Square, but since I have seen smaller ones here in Queens; a small one in Flushing Park parking lot, under the 7 train in 103 corona, and one every weekend at 80th and 34th Ave. Definitely good to buy local.
     
  7. navyypurple
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    navyypurple Member

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    I'll have to watch myself... I might lose my husband to you :) I'll have to try this out!
     
  8. Ashleigh
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    Ashleigh Contributing Member Contributor

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    Lately I've been eating stir-fried veggies in tomato and basil sauce alot, but tonight I think I'ma roast 'em in balsamic vinegar and add some pepper and parsley to garnish. I'll have sweet potatoe wedges with this.

    Sometimes I add sausages to my veggies and tomatoes dinner, whenever I need a little more meat or energy.

    Ah dieting...
     
  9. Capt Bob
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    Capt Bob Senior Member

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    Made something similar last night, I remembered from Nice France;
    A stir fried ratatouille with fresh shrimp cooked in, and on a small bed of fresh fettuccine with asiago grated on top, while hot.
    Merveilleux!!. The best of taste and nutrition transport you, leaving calories behind!.
     
  10. madhoca
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    madhoca Contributing Member Contributor

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    I hate cooking, although I can if I must. I love all kinds of vegetables, though. In Turkey we often steam vegetables and eat them cool with lemon and olive oil on them. I like broccoli, asparagus, cress, artichokes and spinach like this...
    The local market is amazing here for fruit and veg, but you can only get local produce according to the season. No use trying to find something different.
     
  11. w176
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    w176 Contributing Member Contributor

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    You got to tell me what you thought about it later.
     
  12. Capt Bob
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    Capt Bob Senior Member

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    Feel like Poirot doing "Dinner on the Orient Express"-
    But gotta ask-Is that dish where the strips of stir fried beef & vegs are rolled up in a lettuce leaf and eaten by hand??.
    And warm sweet tea?
    Sounds Asian/Indian, British Colony, with a touch of So, Europe-(Tom sauce)-?
    Sounds good but I'd have a red wine the variety lying in the choice--but then I always do--"Sang French"??.
    If I'm not sticking my Culinary nose in--where do you live??.
     
  13. w176
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    w176 Contributing Member Contributor

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    I almost forgot!

    Pork and apples! Any recipe combining the two tends to rock. Perfect autumn tastes and something you can find locally produced in most of the western world.

    Rigth now I'm cooking a stew with pork, that been marinated in apple cider, fried and cooked is left to cook for an hour with zuccinie, mushrooms, onions and small pieces of apple. And the appelcider marinade is reused in the stew. Nom nom nom.
     
  14. Ashleigh
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    Ashleigh Contributing Member Contributor

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    Anyone have any good ideas for plain couscous? I have olive oil and a whole bunch of herbs and spices available, but no stock, lemon, or anything like that.

    How does one make tastey couscous?
     
  15. w176
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    w176 Contributing Member Contributor

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    I heard that whatever spice you use, just a tiny bit of sugar or honey will lift the taste when it comes to couscous.
     
  16. Ashleigh
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    Ashleigh Contributing Member Contributor

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    How about garlic? I have some of that, and parsley. I'm just not sure how I'd get the garlic melded in to the couscous. Do I just crush it and add it in?
     
  17. w176
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    w176 Contributing Member Contributor

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    Garlic gets a bit more bitter (but tastes more too) when you crush it rather then you just chop it. Crushing it is good for stews, but I think chopping it better with couscous
     
  18. Ashleigh
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    Ashleigh Contributing Member Contributor

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    Okie dokie, thanks for the tips...I'll see how it goes, lol.
     
  19. Steerpike
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    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

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    Couscous is also good with some pine nuts and currants. I think those are included in a traditional recipe, but I don't know what other spices are used.
     
  20. Capt Bob
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    Capt Bob Senior Member

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    This is the way I make it:
    Servings:4

    * 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    * 2 teaspoons ground cumin
    * 2 teaspoons ground coriander
    * 1 tablespoon harissa--Nice hot peppery, I like even more!-To taste.
    * 1 lb lean pork loin, sliced into four pieces (4 oz each) or 4 (4 ounce) boneless pork chops, chop loin smaller or bite size if you prefer.
    * 2 teaspoons olive oil
    * 1 1/4 cups couscous--Made on the side--see below. Substitute elbow macaroni
    * 2 1/2 cups fat-free chicken broth, minus amount of tomato sauce.
    * 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
    * 1/4 teaspoon turmeric
    * 8 fresh apricot halves--can use dried
    * 1 tablespoon cilantro, fresh, chopped

    Directions:

    Prep Time: 10 mins

    Total Time: 1-5hrs see marinade.

    1. 1 Combine harissa, cumin, coriander and 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon in a resealable plastic bag. (Use a non-metal container if you prefer.) Add chops to bag, seal and shake until well-coated. Marinate the meat for 30 minutes minimum, in the fridge. Even better 4 hours!!.
    2. 2 Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook pork until cooked through, about eight minutes per side.
    3. 3 Bring broth to boil in a medium saucepan. Add 1/4 teaspoon of cinnamon, turmeric and couscous, If you want to leave couscous in, otherwise substitute macaroni, make/boil couscous separate..
    Turn heat down to lowest possible setting, cover and simmer for 5-7 minutes. Fluff couscous and mix in the apricots and cilantro.
    4. 4 Serve chops on top of the couscous/or noodles.
    5. 5 Cooking time includes the time to marinade the meat.
    I place the couscous in a dog dish by the refrigerator. I don't have a dog, but the word "couscous" seems to draw Muslims and other assorted N. African bomb throwers, and not wanting to appear inhospitable, it's nice to point out the dog dish to them!!.

    You'll probably like it better with the elbow macaroni. And yes some beans and a bit of tomato sauce to taste is permitted.
    Bon Appetite!
     
  21. Capt Bob
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    Capt Bob Senior Member

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    This is the way I make it:
    Servings:4

    * 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    * 2 teaspoons ground cumin
    * 2 teaspoons ground coriander
    * 1 tablespoon harissa--Nice hot peppery, I like even more!-To taste.
    * 1 lb lean pork loin, sliced into four pieces (4 oz each) or 4 (4 ounce) boneless pork chops, chop loin smaller or bite size if you prefer.
    * 2 teaspoons olive oil
    * 1 1/4 cups couscous--Made on the side--see below. Substitute elbow macaroni
    * 2 1/2 cups fat-free chicken broth, minus amount of tomato sauce.
    * 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
    * 1/4 teaspoon turmeric
    * 8 fresh apricot halves--can use dried
    * 1 tablespoon cilantro, fresh, chopped

    Directions:

    Prep Time: 10 mins

    Total Time: 1-5hrs see marinade.

    1. 1 Combine harissa, cumin, coriander and 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon in a resealable plastic bag. (Use a non-metal container if you prefer.) Add chops to bag, seal and shake until well-coated. Marinate the meat for 30 minutes minimum, in the fridge. Even better 4 hours!!.
    2. 2 Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook pork until cooked through, about eight minutes per side.
    3. 3 Bring broth to boil in a medium saucepan. Add 1/4 teaspoon of cinnamon, turmeric and couscous, If you want to leave couscous in, otherwise substitute macaroni, make/boil couscous separate..
    Turn heat down to lowest possible setting, cover and simmer for 5-7 minutes. Fluff couscous and mix in the apricots and cilantro.
    4. 4 Serve chops on top of the couscous/or noodles.
    5. 5 Cooking time includes the time to marinade the meat.
    I place the couscous in a dog dish by the refrigerator. I don't have a dog, but the word "couscous" seems to draw Muslims and other assorted N. African bomb throwers, and not wanting to appear inhospitable, it's nice to point out the dog dish to them!!.

    You'll probably like it better with the elbow macaroni. And yes some beans and a bit of tomato sauce to taste is permitted.
    Bon Appetite!
     
  22. throughthepeephole
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    I'm a novice cook, although I love baking bread and cupcakes :)
    I also discovered that if you want a homemade, healthier version of a Sausage and Egg McMuffin, just add a little soy sauce and pepper to a sunny side down egg and bon appetit - it's practically impossible to tell the difference :D
     
  23. Axo Non Roadkill
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    Axo Non Roadkill Member

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    I like me a good artisanal minestrone. You throw together white cabbage, ham, small ABC-noodles, onion, peeled tomatoes, white beans, porridge, leek, potatoes, carrots and garlic, some spicing according to taste, and cook a nice fat stew of it. Shaved cheese is a nice addition.
     
  24. w176
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    w176 Contributing Member Contributor

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    One of my favorites is mussels and clams. Easy to use and saves the sea, actually improving water quality.

    I used to buy canned mussel meat, baby tomatoes, spinach (optimal) and fresh pasta for every day eco smart luxery.
     
  25. Annûniel
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    Annûniel Contributing Member Contributor

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    I made my first attempt at peanut butter fudge the other day. I think it was fairly successful! I've made chocolate fudge for many years so I'm not new to the process. Still, for some reason it didn't have the same consistency of the regular chocolate fudge. I think I'd have to try it a couple more times before I conclude that its from the peanut butter chips though.

    Still it was very tasty! :)
     

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