1. lawpeder
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    lawpeder New Member

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    Literary Device Question (a word that defines itself)

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by lawpeder, Dec 20, 2015.

    Help please....I need help with the name of the literary device used when a word defines itself. An example is the word, "standoffish". I know there is a literary device to describe it, but there are hundreds of literary devices. Please help.

    -Lawrence
     
  2. SethLoki
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    SethLoki Unemployed Autodidact Contributor

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    Self-referential? Autological?
     
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  3. BrianIff
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    BrianIff I'm so piano, a bad punctuator. Contributor

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    I think it's a matter of linguistics. Literary devices, as far as I know, mean processes writers employ. If a word has a unique definition, or becomes a gerund or something, we take two full steps into linguistics. Better answer will likely come soon.
     
  4. lawpeder
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    lawpeder New Member

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    Autological...That's the word I was looking for. Thank you!!
    -Lawrence
     
  5. GingerCoffee
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    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

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    Autology

    :confused:

    Not the clearest concept I've ever read. Maybe if I re-read it in a day or two...
     
  6. BrianIff
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    BrianIff I'm so piano, a bad punctuator. Contributor

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    I found a different one saying essentially that the definition directly refers to a quality of the word itself. "Short" is a short word. "Categorical" is black and white, while "fluorescent" is bright. I can kinda see how ''standoffish" kinda stands off, with a chip on its shoulder, over by the other cool words....
     
  7. BayView
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    BayView Contributing Member Contributor

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    This makes no sense to me - how is "standoffish" standoffish? I don't get it...
     
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  8. BrianIff
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    BrianIff I'm so piano, a bad punctuator. Contributor

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    It's a stretch for me, but it does seem to have some sort of inherent coldness to it, by virtue of its length and the explosive "off.'' But otherwise, I'm leaning 90% no way.
     
  9. tonguetied
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    tonguetied Contributing Member Contributor

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    Smooth pompous English simply obfuscates mellifluous words.

    Thanks GingerCoffee, nice link. (I know this is terrible but I am not Wreybies afterall)
     
  10. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    Yep. I'm with you on this one. I don't find anything standoffish about standoffish other than its inherent meaning.

    Now, magniloquent, on the other hand, is itself a very magniloquent word. ;)
     
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