1. cutecat22
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    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

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    Lost mojo

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by cutecat22, Oct 11, 2015.

    I seem to have lost my mojo.

    I've tried the usual (music/walks/baking/etc) but it doesn't seem to want to come back.

    I know where I'm going, I know what has to happen, I just can't seem to get it out of my head and onto the page. That being said, I'm at the part of book two where I need to start finishing off the individual scenes and fi them all together with filler-glue and finish the parts I've left until last because other parts seemed more interesting.

    Hmmm - that makes my book sound pretty awful!

    Any ideas how I can get it back? (my mojo)
     
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  2. Poziga
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    Poziga Contributing Member Contributor

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    I'm pretty sure you have to travel back in time and retrieve it from Dr. Evil... :)
     
  3. cutecat22
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    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

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    I better start work on a time machine! ... (wonder if I can borrow HG Wells' ...)
     
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  4. Moth
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    Moth Active Member

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    Sherbet lemons, or mints, or whatever tiny treats make your brain and taste-buds go "Ooooh!"
    For every five hundred words you write, treat yourself with a tiny treat.

    Or, if that doesn't work, the reverse route of starving yourself until you see results may work.

    The thing I've noticed about losing that loving feeling for writing we all know and love is that it comes back once you actually get writing. I'll be sitting at my desk for three hours, forcing myself to spew forth garbage I'm just going to have to cut later while constantly changing the playlist I'm listening to 'cause gods know the mood just ain't right, and it'll all be a rather shitty time. Then, next thing I know, it's another two hours later, the music has long since stopped playing, and I've got some actual writing done.

    Force yourself to sit there for however long it takes. Write and write, even if you hate the words that end up on the screen. Push on through, forget about finding your mojo because it'll find you.

    Or, you know, start drinking copious amounts of alcohol and go all old-school writer. Whatever works!

    Good luck!
     
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  5. cutecat22
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    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

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    I have too many people (kids) relying on me (lifts and cooking) to have alcohol although the bottle of Mojito on my desk is looking very tempting ...

    That being said, I think she (the muse with my mojo) might be on her way back as I've just done 452 words in just under an hour. They are a little trashy and raw, and missing vital emotions and movement but the bones are there and things are moving in the right direction - onwards!

    Many thanks, I think I will try the treats.

    x
     
  6. xanadu
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    xanadu Contributing Member Contributor

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    As sucky of an answer as it is, I really find the only way to get back into writing is to just start writing. It's not easy, especially when you've got over a year's inertia of not-writing to overcome (*ahem*), but in order to start writing again, you have to start writing again. Sure, there's an argument to be made that you shouldn't force yourself and anything you write while forcing yourself will be junk, but I don't necessarily agree completely. I've often surprised myself that way. But if you hope to finish something, you need the discipline to see it through to the end. It's tough, and it sucks sometimes, but if it were easy we'd all be finished and published.
     
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  7. Masked Mole
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    Masked Mole Contributing Member

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    A good way to get rid of writer's block for me is to think of a general concept or characteristic that I find fascinating. For instance, insanity or perseverance. Then I tend to think of a setting for that concept or characteristic. Then I try to think of interesting relationship dynamics for those things, and then I have most of the story. I don't always put these things in writing, but it's a good exercise to get yourself out of the mire.
     
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  8. nastyjman
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    nastyjman Contributing Member

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    Have you tried free writing before your writing session? I do a free writing exercise for 10 minutes before I work on my manuscript. It helps release the creative mind (or muse) and mute the internal editor. In my folder, I have a file called "freewrite.(title of manuscript).txt"

    What I do specifically is type whatever is in my head. It could be about what I did that day, what the word of the day is, etc. But halfway through, I start to free write about what I need to do or what has to happen in my story. If there's a problem with the story, I write it out as if I'm talking to myself. So essentially it is self-talk, but it's on paper (txt file that is).

    If you're doing this, however, DO NOT hit backspace or correct any typos. Also, adhere to the 10 minute limit. You can stop prematurely if you feel you're ready to write.
     
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  9. thelonelyauthorblog
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    thelonelyauthorblog New Member

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    I have different tricks I use. One is to go back to the strongest chapters or best samples of my writing. Rereading them usually sparks my creative juices.
     
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  10. Commandante Lemming
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    Commandante Lemming Contributing Member Contributor

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    One of the best pieces of advice I've gotten in writing is "give yourself permission to write bad."

    In other words, if you can, force your way through the scenes you need to write - even if it's bad, even if it goes very slow. (This goes with one of the other major axioms I've picked up - "Butt in chair, hands on keyboard." - which means that writing can't happen unless you have your computer on, your internet off, and are staring at a word processor...that hurts to do sometimes if nothing is coming out, but usually something comes out if you're stare at a blank page for long enough).

    Bad writing is better than not writing - it moves you through your story AND it keeps you in rhythm. It gets you onward to better scenes, it can be revised later - and half the time it turns out not to be as bad as you thought anyway.

    Personally I think half of what I've written in the last week is utter trash - I can see the glaring problems with it and the underlying problems it exposes in the larger narrative. But I wrote it anyway. And if you're writing filler scenes - the hard stuff that didn't come out the first time - writing bad is probably something that's going to happen anyway. The first attempt at "hard scenes" like that are always going to suck...but you have to write them before you edit out the suckitude.

    I'm not trying to be all meta and say "the best way to start writing is to write" - I get how that's annoying. But in my experience, the best thing to do for hard scenes is to force yourself to stare at a blank page until some form of frustrated brain-vomit ends up written on said page. At least brain-vomit can be edited.
     
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  11. cutecat22
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    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

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    Thanks for all your advice - bum is in chair and fingers are on the keys. Things are coming back to me, I'm writing the sprouts and mushroom scenes (the bits you leave to the end and then feed to the dog sat under the table ...) Hopefully, my muse will fully return so that I can turn these bits into the same Italian Chicken as the rest of the story!

    :-D
     

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