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How do you usually write your story?

  1. In the middle of an action

    50.0%
  2. Building up to the problem

    50.0%
  1. SoulGalaxyWolf
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    SoulGalaxyWolf Member

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    Freelance Making A Better Experience For The Reader

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by SoulGalaxyWolf, Sep 11, 2016.

    I've been writing for a long time and I still trying to get better. I know what I have problems with and some I don't know how to explain. The thing is that I would reread my stories and find them boring although the idea itself is interesting it's just the way I'm writing it. I put what I think is good amounts of description and emotions a little but I'm wondering how else to make my writing more exciting? I am writing as though I'm listing what the MC is doing but don't know how to change it to be less like saying what they did that day to actually telling an engrossing story.
     
  2. Elven Candy
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    Elven Candy Contributing Member

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    Try reading a bunch of the threads here, whatever sounds interesting. I found that's helped me more than anything. Also, look at the Critique section and read the critiques. When you feel ready (and have the requirements complete, though I don't have them memorized), post some of your own work for critique and ask how to make it more interesting.

    Based on what you say here, it sounds like a problem of too much narrative and too little "showing." The famous phrase, "Show, don't tell," is way overdone, but for a book to pull you in, it's good to have a mix of both showing and telling. Research how to do more "showing," and see if that helps your writing to improve.
     
  3. SoulGalaxyWolf
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    SoulGalaxyWolf Member

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    Thank you so much. This is really helpful for me. I'll keep it in mind.
     
  4. Sack-a-Doo!
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    Sack-a-Doo! Contributing Member Contributor

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    In each scene, make sure the goal of that scene is spelled out for the reader. Then write about the obstacles they encounter while trying to achieve the goal. And then, don't always have the POV character achieve that goal. Mix it up so that sometimes they do, but something else goes wrong because of it (another problem they need to solve). Or a second choice: when they achieve the scene goal, it raises a question that wasn't there before. Third option: new information comes to light because of the scene (whether the goal is attained or not) implying that the POV character might need to change their approach to achieving the overall story goal. Swain calls this a scene.

    And in between scenes, the POV character mulls over options: how they're going to get back on track, how they'll assimilate the new information into their overall plan, or how they'll get even more information to answer the new question that came up at the end of the last scene. Swain calls this a sequel.

    Go back and forth like that, scene, sequel, scene, sequel and you'll build interest and tension.
     
    Spencer1990 likes this.

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