1. barcelonic
    Offline

    barcelonic Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2012
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Swansea, Wales

    Spelling 'Mannerism' question....

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by barcelonic, Nov 26, 2013.

    I always spelt this word with a 'u', eg.. 'manneurism'

    Now i do a search and see it's incorrect yet I also notice a lot of other people online using the same incorrect spelling. Now I am curious from where this orginated?

    "From where did I learn this and why?", I wonder. Have any of you guys been spelling this wrongly too?

    Thanks :)
     
  2. obsidian_cicatrix
    Offline

    obsidian_cicatrix I ink, therefore I am. Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2013
    Messages:
    1,711
    Likes Received:
    1,453
    Location:
    Belfast, Northern Ireland
    I can honestly say I don't think I've ever seen it spelt that way. Starting to write really caused me to question my spelling though. I'd always thought it was fine. Then my spell checker kept pulling me on certain words and I was horrified to learn I'd been spelling them incorrectly for years. o_O

    Edit: oh... and while we're on the subject of spelling, (well, that and tense usage.) Can anyone tell me the difference between spelled and spelt?

    Les Mis comes to mind.

    "I dreamed a dream..."

    Could that be alternatively written:

    "I dreamt a dream..."

    Anyone?
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2013
  3. barcelonic
    Offline

    barcelonic Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2012
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Swansea, Wales
    A) I know exactly what you mean. When i was in primary school my teacher would actually consult me when she couldn't spell a word. It was an early source of pride which, I guess, left me thinking I was an ace speller growing up. Then i began to write stuff and realised how many things I could have sworn were right but turned out incorrect.

    B) I don't know exactly, but I would do it like this...

    "He spelled it perfectly"
    "It was perfectly spelt"

    Do you know what I mean here? It is like OK at the end of the sentence to use the latter, but again, I'm not 100% on the correct usage of this.
     
    obsidian_cicatrix likes this.
  4. obsidian_cicatrix
    Offline

    obsidian_cicatrix I ink, therefore I am. Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2013
    Messages:
    1,711
    Likes Received:
    1,453
    Location:
    Belfast, Northern Ireland
    I've been reading up since I asked the question. It seems we, on this side of the pond, use them interchangeably. Perhaps that's why I never really stopped to consider it. From our perspective, there really shouldn't be a right or wrong.
     
  5. barcelonic
    Offline

    barcelonic Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2012
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Swansea, Wales
    In my personal perspective there isn't.

    I think I'd love this language a lot less were it static & unevolving. Languages evolve only because people can't use it flawlessly, it seems. If people know what you mean that is good enough in most situatuons.

    Sadly though for the writer they have other writers to contend with, lol. And we can be a pedantic bunch at times, i suspect.

    :)
     
  6. HarleyQ.
    Offline

    HarleyQ. Just a Little Pit Bull (female)

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2013
    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    58
    Location:
    Gotham
    Well, I would always spell gray with an 'e' and color with a 'u' after the second 'o'. But I'm from America, so of course they were wrong.

    The difference, OP, is that one way of spelling is used in AU, CA, UK, and NZ, while the other is used in America. Same goes for smelt, burnt, dreamt, etc. (And 'z' in the place of 's'.)

    We Americans are very different from y'all.
     
    VM80 and obsidian_cicatrix like this.
  7. obsidian_cicatrix
    Offline

    obsidian_cicatrix I ink, therefore I am. Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2013
    Messages:
    1,711
    Likes Received:
    1,453
    Location:
    Belfast, Northern Ireland
    @barcelonic I agree. I'm all for tugging at constraints, and changing things up, but not when it comes to spelling.

    @HarleyQ. I think that's half my problem, the American English I read in books, often causes me to question my spelling. Tire/Tyre, for e.g. It gets to the point where I can't remember which is which. As for the 'Z's... I hate to see them, don't ask me why. I blame Noah Webster for my confusion. :D
     
  8. HarleyQ.
    Offline

    HarleyQ. Just a Little Pit Bull (female)

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2013
    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    58
    Location:
    Gotham
    @obsidian_cicatrix: I say write in the way you would if you're going for a UK/AU/NZ/etc feel, like if the MC is from there and/or you're publishing mainly for those countries. I've read a couple of books set in America with supposed American characters who called tennis shoes/sneakers trainers and sweat shirts/pants track suits (just a few of many). My mind just about blew up.
     
    obsidian_cicatrix likes this.
  9. obsidian_cicatrix
    Offline

    obsidian_cicatrix I ink, therefore I am. Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2013
    Messages:
    1,711
    Likes Received:
    1,453
    Location:
    Belfast, Northern Ireland
    @HarleyQ. Yep... there's nothing quite like getting ripped out of the fictional bubble by an inappropriate term.

    I'm not considering publishing, so it's not a big issue for me. My characters speak much as I do, and have a European feel for the most part, so I'm happy to continue as I am.

    Now, if I ever did decide to write a novel set in a diner in Louisiana in the '50s, I might just have to reconsider. ;)
     
    HarleyQ. likes this.
  10. barcelonic
    Offline

    barcelonic Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2012
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Swansea, Wales
    As far as I can tell nobody here has confirmed this is, in fact, an Americanism.
    Are you referring to the op example yes - manneurism?

    Either it is an Americanism or it is incorrect.

    It seems incorrect going by various online dictionaries
     
  11. obsidian_cicatrix
    Offline

    obsidian_cicatrix I ink, therefore I am. Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2013
    Messages:
    1,711
    Likes Received:
    1,453
    Location:
    Belfast, Northern Ireland
    I would say the same. I'd imagine if it were an Americanism, Webster's would recognise it as such, but the only entry is for 'mannerism.'

    Perhaps it is one of those words, like so many I've discovered, that sneaks by unnoticed, until something causes me to question it.

    Still, a lesson learned. (Or learnt. ;))
     
    barcelonic and HarleyQ. like this.
  12. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    'spelt' is a variety of grain... ;)

    'spelt' for 'spelled' is not as common in the US as it is in the UK... same goes for any other 't' substitute for 'ed'...

    and i've never in my 75 years ever seen 'mannerism' spelled with a 'u' thrown in... and it's definitely not an americanism... where have you seen it that way, barcelonic?
     
  13. art
    Offline

    art Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2010
    Messages:
    1,159
    Likes Received:
    113
    I've never seen it either. Are you perhaps some place deep down in your noggin allowing the spelling of words like aneurysm to infect your understanding?

    FWIW Manneurysm gets a few hits in slang dictionaries.
     
  14. Wreybies
    Offline

    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    18,901
    Likes Received:
    10,090
    Location:
    Puerto Rico
    Yeah, definitely not an Americanism. We dispense with the "decorative u", not add it. Perhaps there is a subconscious orthographic tying of this word with maneuver. They both share /man/ as a root meaning hand or of the hand.
     
  15. barcelonic
    Offline

    barcelonic Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2012
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Swansea, Wales
    thats precisely what i was hoping to find out with this thread - no idea
     
  16. jannert
    Online

    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    7,812
    Likes Received:
    7,333
    Location:
    Scotland
    Try being an American and living in the UK for nearly 30 years. I'm now mixing spellings like mad ...without realising/realizing it!
     
    cazann34 and barcelonic like this.
  17. barcelonic
    Offline

    barcelonic Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2012
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Swansea, Wales
    I've lived in the UK my whole life. When i was a kid i loved America and holidayed there 5 times and visited several of the south-eastern states but mostly Florida. The weird thing is that I too get awfully confused with Americanisms and I'm always being humiliated for using them because I don't watch television that's made in Britain (except the news perhaps and some comedy). For the last 15 years or so i've watched american tv exclusively. I feel I know people like Bill Maher and Conan as well as any American, and i'm sure Americans will find that hard to believe but, although I'm rare in this regard, there are people like me now the internet means people don't have to rely any longer on commercial scheduled broadcasting.

    I think this is just testament to the cultural influence that the US still continues to have around the world.
     
  18. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    on the other side of the coin/pond, for the past 17 years i've been happily watching all the bbc and cbc i can get, thanks to the advent of satellite access and know the denizens of downton, midsomer, baker street, vancouver and sidney harbor, etc. as well as any UK-commonwealth-dweller...

    which is just testament to the cultural and artistic/entertainment influence the UK/commonwealth continues to have around the world...
     
  19. GingerCoffee
    Offline

    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2013
    Messages:
    17,605
    Likes Received:
    5,879
    Location:
    Ralph's side of the island.
    I know you said, term, not, spelling, but re spelling the z-s and extra u's don't bother me. But the c-k totally does.

    skeptic-sceptic

    Sceptic isn't right, it just isn't. :p
     
  20. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    i agree, gc... it begs to be pronounced with a soft 'c' like 'scepter' and seems to indicate an infectious condition of some sort...
     
  21. PBrady
    Offline

    PBrady Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2013
    Messages:
    174
    Likes Received:
    69
    Location:
    Nottingham UK
    If you had spelt it as "manurism" I could say your spelling stank.

    Spell is an irregular verb. As is sleep.
    You would have slept rather than sleeped, so you would have spelt rather then spelled.
     
  22. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    and, since 'spelt' is a european variety of wheat................................
     
  23. PBrady
    Offline

    PBrady Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2013
    Messages:
    174
    Likes Received:
    69
    Location:
    Nottingham UK
    Ahh. That would be the noun version of the word.

    Such an economic language.

    Why have two different words for two different uses when you can use the same for both?
    The linguistic equivalent of shampoo and conditioner.
     
  24. AlannaHart
    Offline

    AlannaHart Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2014
    Messages:
    367
    Likes Received:
    201
    Location:
    Australia
    A mannerism refers to the manner in which someone does something, right? Like an habitual gesture. You don't sigh in a lofty manneur, so why would it be a manneurism?
     
  25. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    it's possible that some folks do habitually indulge in a kind of sigh that is overly dramatic and can indicate a feeling of superiority, so that could be called a mannerism and be perceived as being done in a 'lofty manner'...
     

Share This Page