1. David Perkins
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    David Perkins New Member

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    Map of the Galaxy

    Discussion in 'Research' started by David Perkins, May 6, 2014.

    Hey Guys,

    I have been searching the web for a special type of map of the galaxy. I have found several maps of stars and constellations, and of the galaxy with some detail. But what I really need is a map that shows me where in the galaxy certain constellations are in relation to our solar system. A top down view if you will, that shows which arms and on which ends of the galaxy these star groups are.

    Something like this but with constellations on it.

    [​IMG]

    Has anyone come across anything like this? The more precise the better, but even a vague placement of the constellations would be more helpful than anything I've found so far.
     
  2. AJC
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    AJC Active Member

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  3. David Perkins
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    David Perkins New Member

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    AJC.

    Yes, something much like that, except that map doesn't show me where our sun/earth is.

    What I am trying to do is build a map of several stars and planets in relation to our own to help give an idea to myself and the reader where in the galaxy my characters are going. And nothing I've found so far really shows where in relation to the WHOLE galaxy things are. Just where in our sky they are, etc.

    edit-

    Unless, correct me if I'm wrong, the numbers on the map you linked match the numbers on radial numbers on my map? Did my lightbulb just turn on?

    For example, Scorpius is near 340 on yours, which would put it near 340 on mine as well?
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2014
  4. AJC
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    AJC Active Member

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    Yes, the longitudes should match up.
     
  5. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    But....

    If I get your meaning correct, if you are looking for where a constellation can be found within our galaxy, in relationship to us, and as one is looking from above the galactic plane... the individual stars that make up any given constellation are going to end up widely scattered across the galaxy and not in a specific region where one can say "Orion is here and Leo is there."

    For example, Orion: Here you can see that though clearly all the stars and other phenomena that make up Orion are all in that direction when one is looking at it, the individual pieces are widely scattered through the depth (or distance) of that direction. Seen from above the galactic plane, you would not see a grouping that is coherent.

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. David Perkins
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    David Perkins New Member

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    Yes yes. That much I do know.

    What I am doing, exactly, is making a list of planets that actually exist and could possibly be colonized in a future set story. So I wanted to find out, with relative accuracy, where these planets actually are. Through my research, all of the known planets are listed with their stars and the constellations they are in. So for my purpose, If i can figure out roughly where that star is, I can figure out where the planet it. or at least with enough accuracy to give my story a since of place.
     
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  7. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    Ah, understood, understood. :) In this, you and I find kinship. I am fond of map-making to give not only my story, but me as a writer, points of reference from which to play off of.
     
  8. Bryan Romer
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    Bryan Romer Contributing Member Contributor

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  9. GingerCoffee
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    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

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    This is an interesting question. Most of the stars we can see (and some lights in the night sky are distant galaxies) would be within this line of sight. Keep in mind we can't see well behind the dense dust in the center.

    http://cdn4.sci-news.com/images/enlarge/image_1649e-Milky-Way-Arms.jpg

    [​IMG]

    I'll keep looking.
     
  10. GingerCoffee
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    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

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    There's useful information here:
    http://galaxymap.org/drupal/node/171

    Scroll down to the Orion Spur at the bottom for the location of the Sun and some of the nearby stars.
     
  11. Burlbird
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    Burlbird Contributing Member Contributor

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    Keep in mind two things.
    First, we are yet to locate and pinpoint any exoplanets suitable for colonization. So, if you are looking for a real world location for your space colony - look no further, there is none (known yet).
    Second, most of the named stars in our sky are big and bright - Altair IV would not be a very hospitable place (even if it exists). This I think you know, but still, I don't know if you are willing to use a name like HR4927d for your colony :)

    Also, a galactic map seems useless for what you want to do, seeing how small is the actually visible and explored region of Sun's near neighborhood...
     
  12. GingerCoffee
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    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

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    You may have to just create your own planets. If you check out the potentially habitable planets on the list that have a Wiki Page, it has location in the Galaxy data.


    [​IMG]

    You can see from this image that the search area for planets is quite limited. At the same time, with planet discoveries now coming by the hundreds, you can imagine just how many habitable planets are likely actually out there.
     
  13. David Perkins
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    David Perkins New Member

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    Thanks for all of y our help and links everyone. I wanted to share with you the map I managed to create with all of these resources.

    Using this list of habitable planets and a few other others from some of your links -
    [​IMG]

    I managed to find enough information to get a general idea of where they are.

    And this is what I made!
    [​IMG]

    Subject to change of course, but it's already helped me out immensely in sorting out my plot and story line.

    Thanks again everyone.
     
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  14. AJC
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    AJC Active Member

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    David, I really like that picture! What program did you use to make it?
     
  15. David Perkins
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    David Perkins New Member

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    I just used photoshop cs6. Used the pen tool to create the boarders and shading. Somehow there is a way to make those dashed lines with the pen tool as well, but I had to add the stroke and erase the line as I couldn't figure it out.

    Also, if you are curious and havent imagined already, the dashed lines represent a possible military expanse which is an aspect of the story i'm hoping to use.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2014
  16. PeterC
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    PeterC Active Member

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    Your map shows the Tau Ceti Fringe starting about 15,000 light years from the Earth. Be aware that Tau Ceti itself is in the solar neighborhood, less than 12 light years away. Does it make sense in your story for that region of the galaxy to be named after such a nearby star?
     
  17. David Perkins
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    David Perkins New Member

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    Ya know, I noticed this. According to information on Tau Ceti it is only 11.9 light years away, and Kepler 22b and other Cygnus planets are around 5-600 light years away. However according the the chart from the first reply:

    http://www.atlasoftheuniverse.com/galchart.html

    the Cetus constellation which is home to Tau Ceti is very far away. However again, When I look at a galaxy chart of Cygnus compared to earth, that is approximately where it is in the galaxy... In fact, all of those planets I marked, except for cygnus, are with in 50 light years, yet when I mapped them, Cygnus was the closest. So on that I am confused.

    I have been thinking about switching Tau Ceti with Kepler22b, because I do need a planet system that is VERY far away for my story.
     
  18. PeterC
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    PeterC Active Member

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    I think you might be misinterpreting that chart. Cetus is far away from the galactic equator when seen from Earth. That means the stars in Cetus are probably all nearby.

    The galaxy is a thin disk. Earth is located near the center of that disk in the thin dimension. When you look "up" and "down" relative to the galactic equator you are looking through the thin part of the disk. Cetus is in the "down" direction. In that direction your line of sight leaves the galaxy entirely after going only a few hundred light years.
     
  19. David Perkins
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    David Perkins New Member

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    Yeah, I'm sure the maps don't match up quite how I laid them out. I've been working more on the map today and I put tau ceti much closer using Sirius as a comparison, as wellas moved all planet systems closer to earths. Sirius is more obviously placed on some of my references. in either case, it's an easy enough fix in my story. Just swap out Tau Ceti for Kepler22b. We'll see how far that gets me.
     

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