1. Lina
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    Lina New Member

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    Master of Creative Writing

    Discussion in 'Publishing' started by Lina, Jul 15, 2016.

    Hi all,

    I have enrolled in the master of Creative Writing at Sydney uni, but I am an international student. I really have no idea about which courses I should select for the first semester. I know that you would tell me that I should ask admissions. In fact, what I am looking for is students' advice, but unfortunately I do not have any friends because I have newly arrived to the uni.

    So can anyone help me please in selecting my units of study?
     
  2. Tenderiser
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    Tenderiser Not a man Contest Administrator Contributor

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    What are your options?
     
  3. Lina
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    Lina New Member

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    1. Introduction to Old English: Old English was the language of England from the fifth century until the twelfth. This earliest phase of the English literary tradition evolved against a background of cultural encounters: as the Anglo-Saxons encountered the culture of Rome, as they adopted and adapted the Christian religion, and as they reflected on their origins on the European continent. This unit introduces students to the language
    spoken and written by the Anglo-Saxons, and presents the opportunity to translate and read Old English texts.

    2. Approaches to Critical Reading: This is a core unit for the Master of English Studies. This unit will introduce students to a variety of critical approaches to literature. In addition to developing critical and theoretical literacy, the unit aims to develop advanced skills in identifying how and why such strategies might be brought to bear on reading literary texts, and to evaluate how effective and/or appropriate such strategies might be in specific cases. The unit also aims to critically examine theories of the text as a physical and conceptual object.

    3. Modern Australian Poetry and Poetics: Critical discussion of Australian poetry has long been preoccupied by the status of its modernism, as a function of wider questions regarding the meaning of Australian modernity. Was modernism only belatedly taken up in the 1970s, or were certain older Australian poets modernist avant la lettre? In this unit students will evaluate a selection of key poems and statements about poetry by Australian writers from 1900 to the present, taking in themes such as: Romantic absence and negativity, the Symbolist inheritance, high and vernacular modernisms, avant gardism and reaction, the Generation of 68, and the fate of postmodernism.

    4. American Romance: Romance' refers to both a passion and a textual form, and this course will focus upon the passionate American and the forms in which this figure appears in texts ranging from the classic 19th century novel through to 20th century film and music. We will explore the Gothic and Romantic heritage of American culture and the ways in which this adapted to the pressures of realism and modernization as the American
    imagination ranged from the transcendental to the popular.

    5. Creative Writing Supervised Projec: This unit will enable approved candidates to pursue an extended creative project under the supervision of an established author, poet, script- or children's-writer. Students will be expected to discuss and plan the project with their supervisor, then submit drafted material to an agreed timetable, and to discuss this drafted material with their supervisor before submitting a revised final draft.t
    Research Essay

    Writers at Work: Fiction: Four major contemporary Australian writers of fiction (to be announced) take participants through the process of composition of their recent works, sharing their techniques and their philosophies of writing.

    Major Movements in Contemporary Prose: This unit introduces students to the rationale, principles and techniques of a selection of four major movements in contemporary prose (largely but not exclusively fiction), the particular movements in any one semester being dependent upon the expertise of the staff available. Sample components: the postmodern novel; ecritures feminines; magic realism; metafiction; contemporary realism; narrative non-fiction; ficto-criticism; the feminist detective; contemporary Australians; cyberfiction; life writing. Each movement is taught by way of two exemplary texts, one Australian and one drawn from other writing in the English language.

    Writers at Work: Screenwriters: Four contemporary Australian screenwriters are highlighted, each presenting three 2-hour sessions. In the first session, a film scripted by the writer will be shown. In the second and third, the screenwriter will explain the genesis of the film, the process of writing it, and the triumphs and tribulations of transferring the script to the screen. In some of the sessions, a key figure associated with the production, e.g. the producer, director, or a lead actor may be present for the students to question.

    Shakespeare and his Contemporaries: The unit explores important works by Shakespeare and his contemporaries in the contexts of late-sixteenth- and early-seventeenth-century England. The unit will analyse the texts and authors in relation to one another to uncover key discourses of the period relating to politics, humanism, drama, poetry, gender and genre. Students will gain valuable insights into the literary and cultural richness of the period and come to a deeper understanding of Shakespeare's relevance and significance in his day.

    Advanced Workshop: Poetry
    Advanced Workshop: Novel
    Advanced Workshop: Screenwriting

    I should select three units.
     
  4. Tenderiser
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    Tenderiser Not a man Contest Administrator Contributor

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    What are your writing goals? I know what I'd pick, but that's because of my particular likes and interests. Do you want to be a novelist, poet, screenwriter, something else?
     
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  5. Lina
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    Lina New Member

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    In fact I like writing poetry, but at the same time I would like to get good marks, so I'd like to pick something that is kind of easy and enjoyable at the same time
     
  6. Tenderiser
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    Tenderiser Not a man Contest Administrator Contributor

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    Well I'd choose 2, 5, and the advanced novel workshop. But only you know what you will find easy and enjoyable :)
     
  7. Lina
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    Lina New Member

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    Thanks so much. I was thinking of choosing 2 but I don't think that I will choose 5 because I am afraid to be swamped with work.
     
  8. struggler
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    There's always part time study. Your grades will improve too if you have more time to focus on a few subjects instead of many. It's always an option.
     
  9. deadrats
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    deadrats Active Member

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    Not always. I did an MFA which required you be a full time student. My program was fully funded with a stipend so they had a lot of say in that.

    I would choose courses that will challenge and push you. Nobody is going to care about your grades, but people could very well care very much about what you write as a result of going through this program. Most importantly, enjoy your time there. It's quite a wonderful experience to have reading and writing be your main focus. Also, make friends with the best writers. These are people who can become life-long critique partners and you can learn a lot from. When I started my program, I was blown away by the talent of my peers. It made me question how the hell I got in. Going to graduate school to study creative writing was probably one of the best things I've ever done for myself. Enjoy it!
     
  10. Dr. Mambo
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    Dr. Mambo Active Member

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    If you're a first year student I'd save the supervised project for later. You'll develop and hone skills in your other classes that will allow you to do more with that class later.

    I'd go for 1, 2, and whichever other one interests you the most. Old English bores the pants off of most folks, but it'll help you a lot with grammar and vocabulary--two things a lot of writers neglect to work on. 2 is self-explanatory, I think. Oh, and if Australian university is anything like American university, then "Major Movements in Contemporary Prose" is going to be a big waste of your time. It'll be more about identity politics than anything else.
     

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