1. JonRhodesUK
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    JonRhodesUK New Member

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    Meditation / Hypnosis

    Discussion in 'Character Development' started by JonRhodesUK, Sep 15, 2008.

    I use a combination of meditation and self hypnosis to create very real characters in my head. The more real they are in my head, the more there is to leap out onto the page!
     
  2. Kratos
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    Kratos Contributing Member

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    How so?
     
  3. Acglaphotis
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    Acglaphotis Contributing Member

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    That's quite a talent (seriously, I can't even medidate right -_-'). I use a wildly different method of just letting them talk to me. Does anyone else do that or am I just schizophrenic?
     
  4. Palimpsest
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    Palimpsest Senior Member

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    I can meditate, but I've never thought of using it for character development. I guess I just prefer a more clinical, Frankenstein-monster-stitching way of building a character at first.

    Well-- except for sometimes, after they've been developed quite a bit, I just play pretend that I'm hosting an acting workshop for my characters. We do "lion face, lemon face" followed by some tongue twisters and trust falls, (never works for me) then we rehearse the scene I plan to write with them improvising... and they ask me what their motivation is.
    I've spent too much time with stage moms. :p
     
  5. Shadow Dragon
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    Shadow Dragon Contributing Member Contributor

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    I'm the same way. I swear, my characters seem to just pop up in my head instead of my actually trying to create them.
     
  6. Acglaphotis
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    Acglaphotis Contributing Member

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    Cool! Now maybe we can make a schizophrenics writers club :p.
     
  7. TheFedoraPirate
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    TheFedoraPirate Contributing Member

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    I once heard a quote, and damn me I can't remember who said it but here's a paraphrase "Some people who hear voices are called mad and spend their time locked in small rooms where they stare at the walls for hours on end ... other are called writers and do pretty much the same thing."

    But yeah, put me on the schizo-boat. Although, my characters don't talk to me they talk to each other and I eavesdrop.
     
  8. Last1Left
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    Last1Left Active Member

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    I just imagine their thoughts and words... I'm liking this schizo-method though. I should attempt to have a conversation with one of my characters some time.
     
  9. tehuti88
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    tehuti88 Contributing Member

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    No clue how to meditate or self-hypnotize. :/ From the looks of it most other people here have no idea either. It sure would be nice though.

    My characters just tend to come to me. I don't talk to them, no, because I'm embarrassed to let them know I exist. But they talk to each other and I observe them and get to know everything about them as they interact. It's just a natural process for me.

    I kind of take issue at the character-creation process being compared to schizophrenia just because people "talk to" their characters--it's kind of oversimplifying/trivializing what the disorder is really about--but considering how often this happens I guess that's just me... :(
     
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  10. soujiroseta
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    soujiroseta Senior Member Contributor

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    after creating a character i usually end up picking up some of their habits and mannerisms, which leads to accusations of insanity but then again they are not unfounded. i once responded to a complete stranger when he called out the name of one of my characters.:p
     
  11. Acglaphotis
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    Acglaphotis Contributing Member

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    It was a joke comparing the creative process to paracusia. Sorry if I offended you:(. But really, people get offended at the smallest of things.
     
  12. Palimpsest
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    Palimpsest Senior Member

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    Not just you. I've known people with similar disorders who don't deserve to be trivialized for it, but are, and have been in some popularly jab-able conditions myself that I felt very sorry (once on the inside) for treating so lightly and presuming to judge when I truly didn't know anything about it.

    But, you're right that it happens too often... way too often to keep expending energy getting huffy and correcting people. (Not that you did, just that it's probably just better that I focus on being more careful with what I say, myself... and grow a thicker skin, not to excuse presumption but to remain healthy. :cool:)

    I don't think being careful with our words is ever the smallest of things, especially for writers.



    But back on topic-- meditations for lucid dreaming became very inspiring for surreal plots or random prompts.
     
  13. AnonyMouse
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    AnonyMouse Contributing Member Contributor

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    I've been known to act strangely after writing for long periods of time. I start to get into a state of mind that completely cuts me off from the outside world. I converse with my characters, sometimes seeing them talking to one another, sometimes just seeing scenery and landscapes and stuff. I never talk to them out loud (I'm not that crazy), but there's a lot going on in my head. I also have a tendency to walk aimlessly around the house when I get into this state of mind. I look out the window repeatedly, even though I don't really care what I'm lookin at; I go to the kitchen and open the fridge, even though I'm not hungry. A psychiatrist would have a field day with me.
     
  14. Etan Isar
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    Etan Isar Contributing Member Contributor

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    I don't do self-hypnosis, but I've used meditation and sveral methods of daydreaming to get more into my characters.
     
  15. tarnished
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    tarnished Contributing Member Contributor

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    Interesting.
    Meditation, traditionally speaking (in my religon), is a way to be completely alert but having a completely clear mind. Its intriguing that this is a way for you to develop charectars. May I ask what type of meditation you do?
    Do you keep your eyes open or closed?
    Traditionally the eyes are open, and focused on an object; sometimes a religous statue or even just a wall. I find when writing I like to have my eyes closed for the brainstorming section of it- a way to completely surround yourself with your charectars and the world your painting with your writing.
    Either way- this is really interesting, and I'd love to hear more.
     
  16. architectus
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    architectus Banned

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    I am pretty sure Dean Koontz has said something like this a few times.

    I am able to see the scene as I type, as I stare at my monitor. I see it in my mind's eye, above and slightly away from my forhead.

    I often meditate on scenes before I write them.
     
  17. TheFedoraPirate
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    TheFedoraPirate Contributing Member

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    Nope, found it. Here's the exact quote: Many people hear voices when no-one is there. Some of them are called mad and are shut up on rooms where they stare at the walls all day. Others are called writers and they do pretty much the same thing. — Meg Chittenden

    Never heard of her, though, aside from the quote.
     
  18. Acglaphotis
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    Acglaphotis Contributing Member

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    I so want that in my sig. Too bad it won't let me put over 2 lines!
     
  19. Etan Isar
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    Etan Isar Contributing Member Contributor

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    There are plenty of different forms of meditation, and it isn't hard to adopt one to fit your goals. For myself, I use closed eyes and the actual psotion isn't too important. The goal is to clear your mind--of everything that doesn't relate to your story. For me, it's more than just characters, but that's not really relevant. You can focus with several methods, some sensory, some completely mental. One is to concentrate on the "colors" that appear when your eyes are closed and let them form into images and scenes. I've managed to have it work even in a crowded restaurant, with lots of noise. How you interact with things after that is really up to you.
     

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