1. David Tice
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    David Tice Member

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    Microsoft Word Question

    Discussion in 'Software' started by David Tice, Mar 30, 2016.

    I'm currently writing a fable based in Japan and alot of the words and places I have drawn from the epic "Shogun" and other similar works based in the Far East. I'm typing it and I have no clue how to get that line over the letter that depicts to the reader how a word should be pronounced and you know how Japan is, almost every word has it. Heres an example, the name: Asakura Omi should have a squiggly line over the second A and one over the M but I don't know how to do it on word. Can someone please help?
     
  2. Steerpike
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    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

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    Go to Insert, and then Symbol. I don't have Word in front of me, but it's something like that. You should see the place to insert symbols in the ribbon. Then you'll get all kinds of symbols, many of which are the sorts of letters you are talking about.
     
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  3. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    Also, just as an aside, the marks over letters like you mention are called diacritics. That should help you searching for how to make particular ones. Make sure you read which kind of computer is being referenced because Windows machines and Macs make diacritic marks in completely different ways.
     
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  4. David Tice
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    David Tice Member

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    Thanks a lot guys, considering what Im writing do you think these are neccasary evils? Do you think it will take away or add to the writing with their presence or lack there of because I'm pushing a deadline and tempted to enter the story in contest without them though my better judgment is saying just add them.
     
  5. Jack Asher
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    Jack Asher Wildly experimental Contributor

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    If you're using a PC you can also go to the start menu and search for "character map." This give you the same interface outside of word. With it you can...better as a screenshot, hang on.
     
  6. Jack Asher
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    Jack Asher Wildly experimental Contributor

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    character-map.jpg

    Select your letter and hit the select button and then copy. Keep in mind that these are all based on font, and some fonts don't have as myriad a selection as others. Times New Roman, for example has over 400, in three or four alphabets, webdings only has 50 or 60.

    The reason I screenshot this thing was for what's in that little red box in the corner. That's the character's alt code. Hold down alt, and press those numbers, in order, on the number pad. not the number bar above your keyboard. That won't work. When you're done, release alt and the new symbol will appear.

    Like this รพ
     
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  7. David Tice
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    David Tice Member

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    Thanks Jack.
     
  8. Lew
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    Lew Contributing Member Contributor

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    At one time I spoke Japanese and read it in Romanji. I have never seen the squiggly marks you describe, not even in my language text. If you are not a good speaker of the language, you might want to check with a speaker to see if they are used or necessary. I don't think so. I have seen dashed lines over vowels to indicate duration, but they are frequently omitted. The first word you mentioned I think would be pronounced a saah k'ra. the second a prolonged and the short u almost silent, but most non-speakers would pronounce it as written. Since they are not trying to communicate with Japanese speakers, but just read, I don't think it will make much difference
     
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