1. bluehouse
    Offline

    bluehouse Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2015
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    10

    Minor traveling from US to England

    Discussion in 'Research' started by bluehouse, Mar 25, 2015.

    If this isn't precisely what this forum is used for, then I apologize. Just looking for a different angle, perhaps one based more on personal experience since this has never happened to me or anyone I've spoken to.

    A plot involves a minor boarding a plane alone from US to England. Through complications involving a predesignated adult to meet him not showing up, he is left alone in Heathrow to figure out what to do next. Basically, I'm looking for aid (hopefully personal experience) in finding out:

    - Other than passport and arrangements made with adults to deliver him to/pick up from respective airports, what else does the minor need to successfully board the plane? Perhaps a note of permission from a parent/guardian?

    - What steps are taken by airport officials in the event of an unaccompanied minor?

    - Furthermore, what would be ways for the minor to remain in the country for a short amount of time?

    So much as viewing this earns my thanks, let alone any offered aid or insight.
     
  2. outsider
    Offline

    outsider Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2012
    Messages:
    968
    Likes Received:
    609
    Location:
    Glasgow, Scotland
    I can't be sure, but I wouldn't have thought any airline would allow an unaccompanied child to travel half way round the world.
     
  3. bluehouse
    Offline

    bluehouse Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2015
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    10
    They do. United seems to have a pretty straight-forward way of going about it, though the process at large is restricted to certain individual flights and not just any available.
     
  4. jannert
    Online

    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    7,827
    Likes Received:
    7,353
    Location:
    Scotland
    It appears to vary from airline to airline, but it's perfectly possible for unaccompanied children to fly internationally. This site might be a good place to start: http://www.airsafe.com/kidsafe/kidrules.htm
     
    outsider likes this.
  5. Commandante Lemming
    Offline

    Commandante Lemming Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    May 8, 2014
    Messages:
    1,243
    Likes Received:
    1,001
    As for remaining in the country - you can use any excuse you want for why he's there as long as he's there for less than three months. The UK is part of the US Visa Waiver Program which allows citizens of allies/safe countries to come to the US for up to 90 days, for any reason, without a visa.

    If you're looking for a longer period of time then maybe some sort of exchange student program.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_policy_of_the_United_States#Nonimmigrants
     
  6. bluehouse
    Offline

    bluehouse Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2015
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    10
    Thanks much to all of you. Collectively, this has proven to be a good start.
     
  7. matwoolf
    Offline

    matwoolf Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2012
    Messages:
    2,327
    Likes Received:
    2,254
    Location:
    Brighton Heights
    There's an airline scheme. I've had some, heh, hilarious experiences with the scheme. The check-in people hang little pouches around the kids' necks and the children get treated like royalty by the airline staff. That was the first time. My kids loved the whole adventure so much that the second time around they wore the previous journey's pouches around their necks, useful for passports all that, teddy bears y'know. So everybody at Heathrow assumed they were properly stamped already, but the pilot wouldn't take off, launch without the new, correct pouches and documentation, despite my wife saying over the phone that they were our children. One parent is supposed to stay at the airport till the plane has left. But that was me, you see, I took them there in the car. I, had, well, gone home. Got shouted at when I arrived home, had to turn around, collect the kids, place them more carefully on a plane the next day. Absolutely no compensation for my trauma.

    I hope that's clear, and helps your research.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2015
    outsider likes this.
  8. Mckk
    Offline

    Mckk Moderator Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Messages:
    4,749
    Likes Received:
    2,535
    How old is the kid? If he's 13 who looks like he could be 15, chances are he'll just travel like normal.
     
  9. bluehouse
    Offline

    bluehouse Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2015
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    10
    I'm seeing now there is a significant difference between younger minors and older ones. The one I'm writing about is 17-18 (senior HS), and from the links/words you all have provided (thanks especially for the story, matwoolf), it seems a minor of this particular age can travel generally unhindered. I'm seeing that in the context of the rest of the plot around this sequence, it's going to be rather easy to write while covering for all the basic facts. Thanks again to everyone!
     

Share This Page