1. Alstroemeria
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    Alstroemeria Member

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    Grammar Mixed metaphor, of sorts

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by Alstroemeria, Dec 14, 2015.

    A question: in a poem, is it alright to liken the first-person (autobiographical, in this case) narrator to one figure in one stanza, and a second figure in another? Does that count as mixed metaphor?

    In my poem, I have:

    / exiting and again entering sweet Eden /

    - but, later on:

    / Must I be the wakeful in Gethsemane? /

    Shall I change the "Eden" Eve reference line to another Christ reference, or is this acceptable?
     
  2. thirdwind
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    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

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    No, this doesn't count as a mixed metaphor. A mixed metaphor combines two unrelated metaphors. What you're doing here is not even a comparison. You're simply saying the narrator is in two different gardens.
     
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  3. Alstroemeria
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    Alstroemeria Member

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    Many thanks. :)
     
  4. Shadowfax
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    Shadowfax Contributing Member Contributor

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    I actually like the contrast between the paradise of the Garden of Eden versus the hell of the Garden of Gethsemane.

    A paradox such as that is what poetry is all about.

    Even if it were a mixed metaphor, it FEELS right.
     
  5. Alstroemeria
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    Alstroemeria Member

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    Thank you! I'm really glad that you like it.
     

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