1. love2listen
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    love2listen Member

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    my new favorite critic

    Discussion in 'The Art of Critique' started by love2listen, Apr 3, 2009.

    I'm working on my manuscript. A friend and "life advisor/mentor" from church was an English teacher at a local college for 12 years before she retired. She is going over it with me. We spent an hour on 6 pages of chapter 1 tonight breaking everything down, and she marked my draft with red ink too. It was a great experience. We're going to do the rest on Tuesday.

    English teachers/former English teachers/English graduates = great reviewers

    :D
     
  2. Manutebecker
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    Manutebecker Member

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    I envy you. My 12th grade Philosophy teacher attended Oxford (no lie, I don't know why he's teaching high schoolers), whenever I ask him to read my stories, even if they're short, he puts it off farther and farther. I really don't think he's busy. He's fat, single, and lives with his grandmother (I swear this guy went to Oxford too, I know it's hard to believe). Cool guy, just not very passionate nor caring about his students writing. Maybe he needs to retire and become bored...
     
  3. Cobaye
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    Cobaye New Member

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    That's great! My English teacher is pretty devoted as well. She gives good critique. IMO, there's nothing worse than a teacher not willing to give their students good criticism. The worst thing you can do to any artist/writer/musician/etc. is tell them their work is good when it's not.
     
  4. Addicted2aa
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    Addicted2aa Senior Member

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    Congrats on the new editor man. There quite useful. I'm lucky in that my dad used to do editing work while he was at Brown. He wasn't an english major, but he still knows what he's talking about, and he shreds my work. It's always a learning experience.
     
  5. LordKyleOfEarth
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    LordKyleOfEarth Contributing Member Contributor

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    That is a rather selfish attitude. I am sure he has a life, and even if he doesen't he has a job already; why should you expect him to become an editor (and for free no less)?

    If he was not passionate about his students he would not be teaching there; I promise you he is not in it for the money.
     
  6. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    That kind of intensive tutelage is a boon, to be sure. Just make sure you study the changes he suggests, and understand the reasoning behind each one.

    I would hope there will be some changes you will stand your ground on, as well. It is very important that the writing be your own, and that you don't depend upon somneone else to be the master of your craft.

    Learbn from him, but question him, even challenge him, as well. If he is indeed an educator at heart, he will respect you all the more for doiing so.
     
  7. pacmansays
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    pacmansays Senior Member

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    LOL, no it's a natural trait of philosophy teachers...they're great teachers, passionate about their subject, intelligent and humourous but tend to turn up late or procrastinate...
     

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