?

What MBTI are you?

  1. ISTJ

    6.5%
  2. ISFJ

    3.2%
  3. INFJ

    29.0%
  4. INTJ

    9.7%
  5. ISTP

    6.5%
  6. ISFP

    3.2%
  7. INFP

    6.5%
  8. INTP

    22.6%
  9. ESTP

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  10. ESFP

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  11. ENFP

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  12. ENTP

    3.2%
  13. ESTJ

    3.2%
  14. ESFJ

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  15. ENFJ

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  16. ENTJ

    6.5%
  1. Daniel
    Offline

    Daniel I'm sure you've heard the rumors. Founder Staff Contributor

    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Messages:
    2,571
    Likes Received:
    402
    Location:
    Peoria, Illinois

    Myers-Briggs Personality Type Discussion (and it's relation to writers)

    Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Daniel, Oct 3, 2013.

    I thought it'd be interested to get a discussion of MBTI personality types going. Particularly, I'm interested in learning if writers are predominately certain personality types rather than others, and why (I suspect they are).

    For those of you not familiar with the Myers-Briggs Personality types, it's basically a psychological test based on the theory that everyone falls into one of sixteen personality types (though there are sub-types according to additional theories). Read more about Myers-Briggs on Wikipedia. It's really quite fascinating.

    It's a little eerie to think that people in the world have minds and personalities structured almost just like yours, but I'm convinced the theory is near correct. For example, I'm an INTP. I was skeptical, but when I read the wiki page on my personality type, it took me aback - it described exactly how I think, interpret information, and view and interact with the world.

    The actual test costs money since it's a real psychological test (I did one at university) but there are tests online that will probably give you a decent idea of your personality type. I can't say this is a good one, but it was accurate for me (no online test is as accurate as the real MBTI test).

    So anyway, what are your thoughts on the MBTI test and theory? How can we use our knowledge of our personality type to better understand ourselves and improve our lives? Are writers more likely to be a certain type, and, if so, why?

    I've included a poll.
     
  2. GingerCoffee
    Offline

    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2013
    Messages:
    17,605
    Likes Received:
    5,879
    Location:
    Ralph's side of the island.
    I don't fit neatly in the categories. I'm an evidence based rational thinker.
     
  3. Lewdog
    Offline

    Lewdog Come ova here and give me kisses! Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2012
    Messages:
    7,530
    Likes Received:
    2,826
    Location:
    Williamsburg, KY
    Well I put myself in the INSF slot as an introverted science minded emotional person. I think studies show that most writers and creative people in general are introverts.
     
  4. Daniel
    Offline

    Daniel I'm sure you've heard the rumors. Founder Staff Contributor

    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Messages:
    2,571
    Likes Received:
    402
    Location:
    Peoria, Illinois
    Are you familiar with MBTI? I didn't think I would either, but after a lot of research I'm definitely an INTP (maybe borderline ENTP). Evidenced-based rational thinker would suggest you're probably xNTx (aka "The Rationals").
     
  5. shadowwalker
    Offline

    shadowwalker Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2011
    Messages:
    3,299
    Likes Received:
    851
    MB is a bit of a self-fulfilling thing, IMHO. People take the 'test' and then it's like your zodiac sign - "Oh, that's me alright!". But there are blinders on because you're not looking at anything except "your" characteristics; if you looked at all of them with the same preconceived idea that "That's me!", they'd fit just as well - because you think they're supposed to.
     
  6. Daniel
    Offline

    Daniel I'm sure you've heard the rumors. Founder Staff Contributor

    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Messages:
    2,571
    Likes Received:
    402
    Location:
    Peoria, Illinois
    I see what you're saying, and that may be true to an extent. However, I considered that and I read through several other personality profiles. Only a few I shared characteristics with, and most weren't even close - no way I'm an S or F even slightly. Maybe I'm so convinced because INTPs supposedly only represent 1-5% of the population, so many of the INTP characteristics I see clearly in myself and I see the opposite in most people. Because these characteristics are seemingly rare, and because there are so many I have in common, it's given strength to my acceptance of the idea.

    You have a valid point though, and I realize these personality types aren't set in stone. But I think that generally they're pretty accurate, most people fall into one one the types pretty clearly, and that there's really something to the theory. Even if you don't think everyone falls into one of the types (and there are sub-types), I think that the basic behind each of the cognitive functions is pretty solid and describes different ways that different people consistently think.
     
  7. GingerCoffee
    Offline

    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2013
    Messages:
    17,605
    Likes Received:
    5,879
    Location:
    Ralph's side of the island.
    But I looked at the categories and it depended on the situation. I am definitely rational (though irrational people often try to usurp the terminology calling nonsense evidence and science religion). But rational doesn't mean you have to ignore your rational biological feelings. Empathy and mirror neurons are real things. So emotions/'feelings' need not be ignored by rational people. 'Intuition' can be rationally explained. As a nurse practitioner, I can look at a person in trouble physically and know the person is nearing a cardiac or respiratory crisis. Some people label that intuition. But it isn't really. It's the brain making a nearly instantaneous assessment of certain observations.

    So I cannot get past that analysis when I look at those categories. I find the terminology meaningless and I'm not convinced the categories accurately describe people. I find the labels and categories are inadequate to explain the complex mixed reality that we are.
     
  8. Daniel
    Offline

    Daniel I'm sure you've heard the rumors. Founder Staff Contributor

    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Messages:
    2,571
    Likes Received:
    402
    Location:
    Peoria, Illinois
    Not all the categories mean what they seem to at face value (the intuition name is kind of misleading). Intuition/Intuitive in this instance of the M-B doesn't mean intuition as it's commonly understood and as you described above. That is, it's not feeling unexplainable intuition. Here's how they describe it on wiki:

    So between the Sensing and Intuition functions, it's the function of trusting concrete, tangible information and ideas verses trusting abstract, theoretical, associable information. I think most people do tend to predominately follow one over the other, though it's obviously a sliding scale.

    Is dislike the idea that these categories describe who we are and categorizes everyone into one of sixteen types, but I don't think that's really what it's attempting to do. There're really describing four possible cognitive functions - that is, mechanisms and patterns of thought - that people can think. People think differently and have different thought patterns of viewing and interpreting the world and ideas. M-B is simply saying that there is a finite number of possible cognitive functions/processes and attempts to define them by the four categories (and further theories expand upon this idea with sub-types). That's my understanding, anyway.
     
  9. 123456789
    Offline

    123456789 Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    6,345
    Likes Received:
    3,092
    They're not calling science religion they're saying certain people treat science like a religion. You still don't get this?:confused:
     
  10. Thomas Kitchen
    Offline

    Thomas Kitchen Proofreader in the Making Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2012
    Messages:
    1,258
    Likes Received:
    422
    Location:
    I'm Welsh - and proud!
    I used your online test, Daniel, and discovered that I am an ISFJ (Introverted Sensing Feeling Judging). After looking up what that meant, I can say that the test is at least somewhat accurate, but for me it was extremely accurate.

    If anyone wants to know how my brain functions, you can get a tour of my mind here: http://typelogic.com/isfj.html :D
     
  11. T.Trian
    Offline

    T.Trian Overly Pompous Bastard Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2013
    Messages:
    2,246
    Likes Received:
    1,449
    Location:
    Mushroom Land
    I tried the test and got to around 20. Too many of the questions left too much for interpretation / were unclear (often my answer would've been "sometimes/half the time" instead of "yes" or "no"), and when I looked at the personality types, I read through about half a dozen and they all fit me. Kinda felt like reading a zodiac where the "predictions" almost always fit you because they fit most people. The real test would probably offer more insight into one's personality.
     
  12. chicagoliz
    Offline

    chicagoliz Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    May 30, 2012
    Messages:
    3,295
    Likes Received:
    815
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Years ago, in college, I took MB twice and got ISTJ both times. These things can change over time, though, so I'm not certain it is still accurate.
     
  13. 7thMidget
    Offline

    7thMidget Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2013
    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    Portugal
    When I first heard about this a while ago, I went looking for forums about MBTI and saw that there is actually heavy competition between people of supposedly different personality types, with each one trying to upstage the other and claim that their personality type is the best one and society doesn't understand them, etc. They would argue about which personality each one should befriend or date and make full judgments on people they didn't even know well. They would also use their types as an excuse not to continue trying to change/improve as individuals. MBTI was just yet another way for everyone to orgasmically stroke their own egos and act superior. It was so human.

    I believe (I hope!) I know myself well enough to not need this type of system to define me. Still, system said back then that I was probably INTP. System happened not to be too far off and I can see how it can be an interesting and useful tool for people, if properly used and taken with a big grain of salt. Our personalities are very fluid. I'm sure that the MBTI theory itself acknowledges this.
     
    minstrel likes this.
  14. Trish
    Offline

    Trish I've been deleted.. again Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,986
    Likes Received:
    224
    Location:
    New York
    I am INFJ, and it is accurate, I think. I read some of the other ones, and while I may have had a couple of things in common (because people can only have so many characteristics) none of the others fit as well as this one.
     
  15. jazzabel
    Offline

    jazzabel Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2012
    Messages:
    4,273
    Likes Received:
    1,666
    INFJ. Uncannily true, and also explains a few paradoxes that have been puzzling me for a long time. Thank you Carl Jung, I always preferred you to Freud anyway :D
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2013
  16. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    i am [supposedly] the 3rd INFJ here so far... yes, most of the characteristics fit, but i didn't bother checking other types... i'd be very surprised if they do, too... the characteristics of a virgo also fit me to a tee, while other signs do not at all, so whatever it all means, i guess it means something... ;)

    i'd taken the m/b test years ago, in my 'old' life and don't recall if the result was the same, but i think it was...
     
  17. Trish
    Offline

    Trish I've been deleted.. again Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,986
    Likes Received:
    224
    Location:
    New York
    Would be interesting to see how the zodiac fits in as well... I'm gemini if anyone else wants to throw their hat in the ring, lol.
     
  18. GingerCoffee
    Offline

    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2013
    Messages:
    17,605
    Likes Received:
    5,879
    Location:
    Ralph's side of the island.
    "People" wasn't referring to this personality scheme, I was referring to irrational thinkers who believe they are rational and how they rationalize that belief.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2013
  19. 123456789
    Offline

    123456789 Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    6,345
    Likes Received:
    3,092
    I wonder if anyone thinks they're irrational.
     
  20. JJ_Maxx
    Offline

    JJ_Maxx Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2012
    Messages:
    3,339
    Likes Received:
    502
    I'm bucking the trend completely, as I am most definitely an ENTJ. (Extravert Intuitive Thinking Judging)

    I guess I'm one of the oddball anti-emotional, logical, technical writers.

    Also, looks like I'm rare.
     
  21. GingerCoffee
    Offline

    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2013
    Messages:
    17,605
    Likes Received:
    5,879
    Location:
    Ralph's side of the island.
    I looked at the Wiki page before I replied. I also started to take the test you linked to. By question 12 I gave up after so many were impossible to answer given the adverbs, often, usually, likely and so on in questions that were situational.

    For example:
    1. You are more interested in a general idea than in the details of its realization
      YES NO
    2. You tend to be unbiased even if this might endanger your good relations with people
      YES NO
    3. Strict observance of the established rules is likely to prevent a good outcome
      YES NO
    4. It's difficult to get you excited
    #1 above (#6 on the test page): What does that even mean? The details and the general idea are correlated, it's not one or the other.
    #2: Do I tell people what I think? Most people who know me on the forum would say, definitely yes. But I don't speak so frankly is a purely social setting, or with my clients.
    #3: There is no answer the way the question is worded because 'strict observance' and 'likely to prevent' are again situational. I would definitely break a rule if it were necessary, but would strict observance be likely to prevent a good outcome, no, it would only sometimes prevent one. I do hope, for example, that my health care providers strictly observe infection control rules. But following mandatory sentencing guidelines is likely to prevent a good outcome. Yet at the same time, mandatory sentencing prevents a different problem, that of judges who are too lenient.
    #4: How does one interpret, "difficult"? I get very excited about some things and not others. Are they asking me to estimate the proportion? Or are they asking me if any one thing can easily get me excited?

    I stopped at #12: You believe the best decision is one that can be easily changed.

    It's meaningless!

    I can apply both of those categories to rational and irrational thinking.

    Concrete and tangible: Repeatably observable objective scientific evidence.
    Concrete and tangible: You got sick after a flu shot, but you draw the false conclusion the two events were related and ignore other systematically collected evidence that they were not.

    Abstract, theoretical, associable information: Quantum mechanics, quantum entanglement, gravitons, wave vs particle photons.
    Abstract, theoretical, associable information: Homeopathy.

    Looking at other aspects, I tend to see the bigger picture and how things are related. And I'm not a concrete thinker when it comes to those aspects. I do not identify with being what I think of when I hear the term, concrete thinker.


    I do agree there are categories of thinkers. Jonathan Haidt suggests two successful evolutionary paths made us this way: oversimplified think of it as 1) the people who stayed put, safe in caves or wherever and survived by tradition and familiarity and 2) the people who went out exploring, innovating, thriving on change.

    I agree with the finite range maybe with a continuum rather than discrete edges. And some people are a mix, moving along the continuum with overlapping fungible features, while some people clearly stay in certain boxes.

    Is there a personality type for thinks this version of analyzing personality types is bunk? ;)
     
    7thMidget likes this.
  22. 123456789
    Offline

    123456789 Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    6,345
    Likes Received:
    3,092
    I totally agree with you everything you said here, Ginger, except...I wouldn't quite put "wave vs particle photons" as abstract or theoretical. Double slit experiment and photoelectric effect are both "repeatably observable objective scientific evidence."
     
  23. Trish
    Offline

    Trish I've been deleted.. again Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,986
    Likes Received:
    224
    Location:
    New York

    I've got to say... I don't understand how you don't understand the questions. For instance, the word "likely" in your example #3, simply means is it more likely than not. It's just basic comprehension. Your need to have a 100% clear answer - to a question that you're arguing is too broad, is kind of funny to me. Also the last example "You believe the best decision is one that can be easily changed" - how is that useless? How is any of it? It's asking simple questions...

    And the first one - that you asked what it means? It means, simply, do you believe the devil is in the details? Or are you the type of person that likes the general idea, but doesn't want to (or can't) focus on the details as much? And these kinds of things are always meant to be taken on a "more often than not" kind of basis, so you don't have to say "Well, in situation A - yes, but in situation B - no." I don't understand how it's that hard?
     
  24. 123456789
    Offline

    123456789 Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    6,345
    Likes Received:
    3,092
    The details and the general idea are equally important if you want to attain mastery of something. That's why good bosses were grunts once, so that they can not only deliver the big picture, but also use their past experience to help with the details.
     
  25. jazzabel
    Offline

    jazzabel Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2012
    Messages:
    4,273
    Likes Received:
    1,666
    @GingerCoffee: You are overanalysing :) Like much of psych testing, it is loaded with questions designed to confirm or oppose the validity of certain answers. Also, it's about considering, and deciding, which option you think applies to you, at the time of taking the test. The only accurate personality test is MMPI, with it's 300+ (or is it 5oo+? It's been a while :)) questions, conducted by a psychologist over several interviews, and that is designed to spot personality traits and disorders, most often in forensic psych patients. This is more like a pop-quiz based on a theory, it shouldn't be taken too seriously. But for what it is, it'll spot generalised tendencies, if answered truthfully.
     
    JJ_Maxx likes this.

Share This Page