1. Benjamin Harris
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    Benjamin Harris Member

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    Name for a Palace

    Discussion in 'Setting Development' started by Benjamin Harris, May 27, 2013.

    In my fantasy world, there is a palace that is the centre of the civilisation of an entire landmass. It was built as a symbol of defiance against a warring nation at the turn of the tide of a major, long lasting war. The civilisation as a whole share many similarities with the Viking/Scandinavian culture through the middle ages and the names of many places and people are based around it. What would be a suitable name for a palace that stands as a centre of culture and power in this culture?
     
  2. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    why don't you try googling norwegian place names?... you should come across something you can change a bit to do what you want...
     
  3. Keitsumah
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    Keitsumah The Dream-Walker Contributor

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    Center and Power... lol I never look into proper words I just make up stuff that sounds good. (example: I have a city named Altheria in my book)

    well here are some random ones you may want to pick through:

    -Venrir (Ven-rear)
    -Orgouth (Or-gooth)
    -Urrenheim (Oar-ren-heim)

    I would probably be able to name more but they kinda branch off into other society themes, so i tried sticking to the culture you named.
     
  4. jannert
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    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

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    I'm interested in archaeology (as a lay person only) and am fascinated by what they've been uncovering recently on Orkney, near the Ring of Brodgar (a ring of standing stones.)

    Archaeologists are presently uncovering a HUGE settlement, that nobody knew was there until recently. They're saying it is going to turn the history of northern Europe on its head, because it now appears that Orkney was the centre of civilised life at that time (probably religious, rather than defensive) and not a simple backwater that everybody's assumed it was all these years. This discovery predates any other neolithic settlement anywhere else in northern Europe, so it's where 'our' civilisation began—perhaps.

    The site is called Ness of Brodgar, because it's located on the narrow strip of land (a ness) between the standing stones and the larger land mass of mainland Orkney. It looks as if neolithic people would have been required to pass through the buildings which are currently being uncovered, in order to access the standing stones.

    I love the name Brodgar. Maybe you could use something similar? Spell it slightly differently, using different vowels or something? Bredgar, Brodgir, something like that? You could make up what the name means.
     
  5. TLK
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    TLK Active Member

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    Using a tactic I often use, I've just looked up "defiance" in an English to Norwegian Dictionary. It came up with "motstand", "motvilje" and "trass". Personally, I think the first one sounds like a good name for a fortress and the second would also make a good name, with a few alterations to make it more friendly to English speakers.
     
  6. TerraIncognita
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    TerraIncognita Aggressively Nice Person Contributor

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    This is what I was thinking.
     
  7. Benjamin Harris
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    Benjamin Harris Member

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    TLK, I certainly agree with the first one being a good name for a fortress - whilst I won't directly use that specific name, it will likely be some derivative of it. Thanks for the help.
     
  8. Bjørnar Munkerud
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    Bjørnar Munkerud Contributing Member

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    There are many different possible routes you can go on this one: descriptive or non-descriptive name, named after something else, what it does, where it is, or an original name, something in English or something in a fictional, native, or old language or dialect/spelling/accent etc. Should it be long? Is it comedy? You know best!

    Suggestions:

    Paradise Place Palace
    Sveldenstadt (or similar sounding names, possible with suffixes "-berg" or "-burg")
    The Palace (or just Palace)
    leave it unnamed, possible with humourous self-depracation or annoyance among people working there or visiting it
    some humourous name, at least with contemporary ears, such as an unflattering or insulting name (Nippeltowne comes to mind as a possibility)
    The High Seat, Halls and Throne of Our Ancient Emperors Who Granted Us this Land with their Own Blood, Sweat and Tears (Bonus Points if for comedic effect it's just called THSHTOAEWGULOBST or "The High" or "Ancient Emperor(s') Palace" or similar)
    Palasia (o some other obvious reference to what it is)
    (The) [Insert Continent Name Here] Palace
    The Palace that Must/Shall not Be Names
    Something humourously boring, bureaucratic and difficult to remember; like "The Central Continental Official Classic International Institution of Ancient History and Museum of Ancient Studies" (Bonus Points if the description/name/title is considerably misleading and/or unnecessarily long)
    something amusingly ordinary for its size and importance, such as "Limerick House for Traditional Security", "Brighton Castle", "Indianapolis Hall" or "Dakota Prince Residence", or just "Tring", "Chicago" or similar (and doesn't have to have anything to do with the actual cities or anything)
    a meaningful name; like Ur, Ursa, Ursula, New Babylon, The Forbidden City of the West or Sanguinary
    something grand, like "Goldenport" or "Mountainbreak Grande Expeditionary Fort"
    a perfectly ordinary name (or heading into the realm of fantasy names), like Tlopville, Sows, Craveston or Elvungree
    a name created from existing place name components (i.e. something like "East New Oxford Whangarei Road Palace", or perhaps something a bit shorter ... )
    the existing name of the area (where there was once a country, region, city, forest or whatever)
     

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