1. StormEnchancter
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    StormEnchancter New Member

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    Naming a special attack in Japanese

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by StormEnchancter, Jul 8, 2016.

    I've been studying Japanese for a bit out a year and I need a bit of help in writing the name of a special sword move that I want to include in the work I'm writing. The move is called "God's wind" and I don't know if 風の神 (Kaze no Kami) or 神の風 (Kami no Kaze) works or do both of them work?
     
  2. Dark Severance
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    Dark Severance Member

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    Technically both would work in terms of the actual true definition of what you are trying to do. However the preferred method structure would normally be "Kaze no Kami". However I'm not an expert, just based on my experience and from listening with countless discussions of friends and family about Japanese grammar, placement and actual Kanji vs Romanji, etc.
     
  3. Sifunkle
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    Sifunkle Dis Member

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    I'm pretty sure there's already a real-life 'move' coined in Japanese with that exact meaning: kamikaze.
     
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  4. SethLoki
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    SethLoki Unemployed Autodidact Contributor

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    There's a line in a song I like which is about the above (at least while they lined up) Kamikaze pilots. There was a supposedly a radio signal, a nod to action, given to them that contained the words 'Tora Tora Tora'. It interested me and from what I recall/read; it meant 'lightning attack'.

    Any use?
     
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  5. Iain Aschendale
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    Iain Aschendale Contributed Member Contributor

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    Looks like "lightning attack" is the correct translation, but it's from the movie about Pearl Harbor, not kamikaze suicide pilots. Only reason I know is it was on cable two weeks ago :)
     
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  6. SethLoki
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    SethLoki Unemployed Autodidact Contributor

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    Ahh, okay. Well I'm mindful I should download the song; I liked, it'll be a blast from the past.
     
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  7. Mckk
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    Mckk Moderator Staff Supporter Contributor

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    Kaze no Kami doesn't mean "God's wind" - it would mean "The God of wind".
    Kami no Kaze would mean "God's wind" I believe.

    Double check on that, since it's Chinese I speak, not Japanese. But the "Kaze no kami" structure works exactly the same way as in Chinese if I wanted to say the same thing, so... And of course, the famous title "Valley of the Wind" is "風の谷" (Kaze no Tani). Same structure.

    However, unless you're drawing manga, I'm unsure of how having a name for an attack is gonna work. In narrative it would just look weird if your character shouted the name before actually striking :bigconfused:
     

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