1. taytay98
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    taytay98 Member

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    Need Help With a Few Facts, That's All.

    Discussion in 'Research' started by taytay98, May 15, 2011.

    OK! Here is the question.



    But of course, behind the question is a little story.



    I have an idea for a series, possibly, similar to CSI, Criminal Minds, NCIS... All those shows that involve crime and processing evidence and stuff. So, just to make sure everything was some sort of realistic, I went onto Google and asked a few questions. Apparently, if I was to use that stuff, things would be quite boring.



    So, would it be okay if I sort of bended the truth on how the did things? For example: It wouldn't be interesting if they rarely had action, or they were just processing blood and BAM! It's done, would it?



    From what I understand, only CSI/Field Investigators with police training carry guns, and they don't work in the lab. They usually don't interrogate people, and they usually don't arrest people either. Would I be able just to bend it slightly, so they would be able to do those things?
     
  2. Protar
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    Protar Active Member

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    Certainly. TV shows and books do this all the time. Don't go too far from the truth if you can help it, but if the truth would make for a dull story then go for it.
     
  3. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    sad to say, csi and its ilk get away with that sort of nonsense all the time...

    i find it beyond ridiculous to see csi guys and gals leading the charge with guns drawn, into places where suspects are supposed to be, and giving orders to the 'real' cops in the rear, who are stupid enough to be letting them do so...

    same goes for interrogating and arresting suspects, which is also only done by the 'real' detectives and uniformed cops...

    as for your desire to write something similarly idiotic, i can only hope you don't!

    coming down to the sad realities of tv series, you should know that it's virtually impossible to get a proposal for a new one read by anyone in the industry, unless you already have a good track record as a screenwriter and an agent with major connections on the inside...

    the best way to break into writing for tv is to get a low-level job, so you can learn the ropes and start making your own connections... after you've been there long enough to do that, you might be able to get an established 'player' to pass on your proposal... which, by the way, is very detailed and must be structured according to pretty rigid standards... for instance, do you know what a 'bible' is?
     
  4. taytay98
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    taytay98 Member

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    I don't plan on trying to wrote screenplays, if that's what you're getting on with.
     
  5. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    I wince whenever I hear someone obviously new to writing saying they have an idea for a series. Think one novel (or script), and put "series" out of your head. You finish a book, and it gets published, that's the first you should allow yourself to consider "sequel". If it turns into a series at some point, yay. And that is a good time to think about breaking out of your rut.

    But to your original question, yes, you can stretch the truth, and stretch it a lot. In fact, if you don't streatch the truth, a true novel about forensics would probably be pretty boring.

    A good forensics investigator will deal with facts, and only facts. He or she will keep an open mind, and not construct theories about how the crime was accomplished, much less who done it. It's up to the detectives and the prosecutors to decide what those facts mean for the case.

    A forensic scientist who forms theories is biased, and very liable to miss key evidence, or worse yet, throw away facts that don't support the theory as botched evidence.

    If a detective or prosecutor asks whether the evidence is consistent with the facts, the forensic specialist's beat role is to indicate evidence that is not factually consistent with that conclusion.
     
  6. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    you said 'series' and mentioned tv series, so i had to assume that's what you meant... so, do you mean a series of novels?
     
  7. taytay98
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    taytay98 Member

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    Novels, yes. But, I think I have my answer now. Thanks for the help!
     

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