1. Roobear
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    Roobear New Member

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    Traditional No Clue

    Discussion in 'Publishing' started by Roobear, Jun 18, 2013.

    I am completely new here. I have been writing since i can remember and REALLY enjoy it. Only recently have i considered actually trying to publish something.

    Now, i'm nearing the end on my potential novel i want to publish, so i clearly need to start thinking about how to publish it. The problem is that i have absolutely no clue about how to do it! I have gone through threads and people are using lingo i've never even heard of before.

    This might be really stupid or naive of me but what is a query? And how on earth do i go about publishing?

    Any replies are much appreciated :)

    P.S I wouldn't want to self-publish or ePublish
     
  2. EdFromNY
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    EdFromNY Hope to improve with age Supporter Contributor

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    In traditional publishing, you can try to go directly to a publisher or you can try to get an agent to do it for you. The latter is still recommended, and the first step is to send a query letter to the agent. A query letter is simply one-page effort to catch the agent's interest in your novel - a brief description (not a full synopsis) and any writing credits you might have. There are numerous threads on the subject.

    There are many published guides on agents as well as online resources, and most will list the agent, the agency, and what kinds of works they are likely to represent. Before querying an agent, you should check them out online to see what their specific submission guidelines are. Some will want a query letter only, some may want a synopsis in addition to the query letter and some may want a chapter (rare these days, I believe). Never send more than they want. If they like what they see, they will ask for a few chapters or possibly a full manuscript (which is the farthest I, personally, have gotten). Before signing with an agent, make sure you check the web site "Editors and Predators" to see if they're legit. Beware of any agents who charge up-front fees. Legitimate agents get paid a percentage of your earnings on the work they represent, and you and the agent enter into a contract.

    The advantage of the agent is that they will have an entrée to the editors who are most likely to be receptive to your work. Once an editor has agreed to take on your work, you will sign a contract with the publisher for a set royalty percentage. Once you do, it is usually about a year to actual publication, during which time you will make revisions suggested by the editor. You will also have to review and proofread their product.

    You may also choose to submit your work directly to publishers ("over the transom"), but you will have to seek out those that accept unagented submissions and are interested in your genre. When I first became serious about writing, "over the transom" submissions had a success rate of about 1%. I believe the percentage has significantly decreased since then.

    It's a long, hard road. Best of luck.
     
  3. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    there are many threads on this site that explain the 'getting published' process... do a site search and study the info you'll find there...

    you can also find lots of basic info with a google search for 'how to get a novel published'... be sure to put the phrase in " " to cut down on the number of irrelevant hits...

    ed's advice/info is good for starters...
     
  4. Krishan
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    Krishan Active Member

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    I'd recommend greatly The Writer's And Artist's Yearbook. As well as the very-useful listings it contains, it also has a lot of information on how the publishing industry works - and it's suitable for someone with no previous experience.
     

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