1. mg357
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    mg357 Active Member

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    odd questions?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by mg357, Feb 9, 2013.

    I have a couple of rather odd questions in many romantic stories or movies when the leading man is about to do something dangerous or go out and perform a dangerous task where he may get hurt or killed the leading lady gives him a scarf or handerkchief for good luck, why do that do that and why do they choose a scarf or handerkchief?

    I don't understand that and if anybody here can explain that to me i would appreciate it very much.
     
  2. BritInFrance
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    BritInFrance Active Member

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    It is called a Lady's Favour. She gives a personal item to the "knight" for safe keeping on the understanding that he must give it back (implying if he promises to bring it back, he can't die, because he would break his promise to a lady). The handkerchief idea comes from when knights would display that they had their lady's favour by tying her handkerchief to their lance during combat.
     
  3. Xatron
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    Xatron Contributing Member

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    It is indeed called a "Lady's Favour", but it's concept is slightly different from what britinfrance said. On the first day of a jousting tournament or fighting games, the knights of the kingdom would parade in front of the stands where the spectators were seated and every knight would choose one lady whose favour he would ask for. Should the lady decide not to grant him his favour he had to go without and could not ask another. If the lady did indeed grant him her favour though, she would give him a garment or ribbon that he would carry throughout the tournament and depending on how intimate the garment was, it was considered equally lucky. If the knight won the tournament, the lady was given recognition as both one of the most beautiful ladies of the kingdom as well as one of the luckiest ones, as well as a prize. The knight had the honor of said lady's favour.
    As per to why they usually choose a scarf or handkerchief, most did so to protect their honor, as giving a more intimate garment to their knight could be misinterpreted as having a more intimate relationship with them as it was appropriate.
     
  4. Ancientunion
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    Ancientunion Member

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    I never seen this before, but It may be a Lady's Favour.

    Maybe Its some percent of good luck? such as some people say this In contests; Break a Leg. Which means Good Luck for a strange reason.
    Maybe the scarf and handkerchief Is some type of luckiness? or maybe like small protection (Or If they get a wound, they could use the scarf/handkerchief to stop the bleeding/or to bandage the wound.)

    Or, If the HE Is going onto a journey that may be a dangerous task, the handkerchief or scarf may be, for the HE to remember his loved wife/leading lady.
     
  5. The Tourist
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    The Tourist Banned

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    Yes, it dates back to knighthood, but I find examples in modern times. Even within my own life.

    Many of the knives I sell go to the mothers of soldiers about to be deployed. The women worry for their sons, and they feel helpless to protect them. In giving them a gift, they are actually bestowing a talisman.

    Like most wives, mine worries about my safety, especially since I drive motorcycles at high speeds on the Interstate. She always admonishes me to "be safe."

    But more to the point, she personally knitted me a hat. Think of the "watchman's cap" in Then Came Bronson. She crafted me a good luck charm.

    I think that if a woman gives you a gift like this it's the ultimate statement of love.
     
  6. jack lee
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    jack lee New Member

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    i did not know what it is called, but it is convinient for someone to tie a piece of clothing to something, hope someone you care good luck. scarf and hankerchief become one of the items
     
  7. Pyraeus
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    Pyraeus Member

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    If what I was told is true, "break a leg" refers to a kind of rope at the theater; the "leg" is the rope they use to open and close the curtains. If an actor/actress were to do so well that the crowd wanted the curtains to be reopened after being shut, the "leg" would end up breaking from all the opening and closing. So "break a leg" doesn't mean, "break your leg" it means they hope you are received really well.

    I am really hoping that whoever told me that was right.
     
  8. niallohagan
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    niallohagan Member

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    I had heard it originsated in the theatre but didnt klnow that was the reason
     

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