1. stubeard
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    stubeard Active Member

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    Off of / off

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by stubeard, Aug 24, 2010.

    Which is correct?

    "Get off of the roof!"

    or

    "Get off the roof!"
     
  2. Manav
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    Manav Contributing Member

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    Both are correct. I was confuse too so I looked up.

    My dictionary says "off of" is American and informally use.
     
  3. Elgaisma
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    Elgaisma Contributing Member Contributor

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    How angry is the person saying it? That would determine it for me. If I am hopping mad with the kids I wouldn't bother with the of.
     
  4. Manic Writer
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    Manic Writer Member

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    "Off of" is also southern UK dialect.

    I would say "off of" could be used in dialogue to indicate a slightly colloquial/informal style of speech, but probably should not be used outside of dialogue.

    "Get off of that roof before you fall and break your neck," shouted Bill, who then watched in horror as Jim lost his footing and fell off the roof.
     
  5. Elgaisma
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    Elgaisma Contributing Member Contributor

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    I'm Northern English and would also use it thats why I asked how angry was the person because to me off of is a polite request whereas get off is an order:)
     
  6. Manic Writer
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    Manic Writer Member

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    I have recently returned to live in England after spending almost 25 years in the United States (mostly on the West Coast). As a result I am totally mixed up by the subtle differences between "British English" and "American English".

    Wikipedia has a fascinating article on American and British English Differences

    My (American born) wife and I have been married for nearly 25 years and we still discover differences in our English usage on a weekly basis.
     
  7. madhoca
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    madhoca Contributing Member Contributor

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    'off of' is only for colloquial, not formal use. It's used by some people in the UK but to me sounds less educated--please excuse me for sounding pompous here but I'm having trouble finding a way to express this politely.
     
  8. Elgaisma
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    Elgaisma Contributing Member Contributor

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    :) its merely a product of your generation and class lol same thing my Mother and Grandmother would say (however my Great Aunties would have thought it was snooty to think that way:)). To my generation an accent or a collquialism is merely a product of where you are from and not your education. I think I may have been the cross over generation speaking RP at home and scouse at school. There are times where I would sound even less educated say 'Gerr off o da sofa'

    But you are right should only be used in speech, and is unncessary. It would depend Stubeard's location, age, dialect and intended audience how acceptable it would be to use I guess. Also what dialect, age and location, etc his character uses.
     
  9. minstrel
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    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

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    I'm Canadian/American, and to me it would depend as well on the precise words used. I would say "Get off the roof!" or "Get off of that roof!"; the second being a bit more emphatic, as though I was commanding a child.

    I would be less likely to use "Get off that roof!" or "Get off of the roof!" - neither fits in my mouth. So if I use "that" instead of "the", I'll be likely to use "off of" instead of "off".
     
  10. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    even in america, 'off of' is still considered bad grammar by those of us to whom using good grammar is important...

    yes, it's used by many... but so are many other ungrammatical-isms... and all it does is show they haven't learned to speak/write well...
     

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