1. sereda008
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    sereda008 Senior Member

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    Personal style of writing...

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by sereda008, Oct 26, 2010.

    So I am writing in such a way that might prove to be a somewhat strange read. I mean I am writing in such a fashion that might be considered significant on itself without the story.
    I am bad at explaining such things, but what I mean is that, is it fine to write in a personal tone (to me) which may be somewhat different from usual story telling? I mean a style close to the 1700 century. Might this in any way influence the interest of the reader?
     
  2. Mallory
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    Mallory Mallegory. Contributor

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    I can't say much without knowing exactly what you're doing. It could be brilliant, and breaking new grounds in the world of writing; or, it could be awkward and it could just suck.

    Also, even if you describe it, I've have to see the quality/style of the writing to really answer.

    If you want to PM me a few paragraphs of your writing in this stlye, I'd be able to give more feedback.
     
  3. w176
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    w176 Contributing Member Contributor

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    Yes for good and for bad, no matter what stylistic attributes you chose or how strong they are.

    The key to develop your style as something positive is to write and write and have a lot of people read what you write and get their feedback. You need to get reader reaction to learn how to make your style work really well.

    Its not just a matter of developing a style, you got to make it work too and that takes work.
     
  4. Melzaar the Almighty
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    Melzaar the Almighty Contributing Member Contributor

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    If it's all phrased like that, then yes, I wouldn't read it. :redface: I might be pretty out of it now because of painkillers and headache and general total lack of sleep, but... I had to read your post four times for it to make sense.

    I've read a fair amount of extremely old novels from the early modern period, and I can read them pretty easily because I'm in the mindset, know what I'm looking for, and, most importantly, the authors weren't doing it for any sort of puprose.. They wrote like that because that was how they thought and breathed the language. I very, very rarely see an author pulling off that style in the modern day and age just because people do not THINK like that. You might write in that style a lot, but you were not brought up writing in that way, unless you had a 1700s governess raise you (doubt it :p) or something like that. They have a way of using language which is more than fancy words and odd sentence structure.

    Either immerse yourself until you're confident you can pull it off, and practice a lot, or try to tone it down.

    the short version is, I have to read stuff like that all the time for my history/literature course and it would do my head in to read it for fun as well, so I am automatically not interested. :p
     
  5. minstrel
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    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

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    If you do it well, it could be brilliant. The only problem I can see is that if you write in a style that is difficult for ordinary readers to understand, you are limiting your audience to a few intelligent, well-educated people with a lot of patience. They may love what you're doing, and it may have real artistic value, but don't count on it being a bestseller.

    Some examples of unusual style or language are:

    A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess
    Riddley Walker, by Russell Hoban
    Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce (the king of all bizarrely-written books)
     
  6. sereda008
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    sereda008 Senior Member

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    lol (Laughing Out Loud)! 4 times to read over my text... wow. This is why I warned you that I am not good at explaining such things. In a novel I automatically write differently than in a forum, so no, I do not write in such as style. And by 'Personal Tone' I meant the way I think. I would not say that it is of the nobility class, but it is SLIGHTLY different from what people might tell at times. It is the way I think, but I would not say that it is too much out of this world.
    Once again, I am bad at explaining things in forums and there is unfortunately nothing I can do about it. It has something to do with my psychology.
     
  7. skeloboy_97
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    skeloboy_97 Senior Member

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    i dont really like them stories but im sure theres plenty of others to do. theres no harm in trying something new here and then. also every single book ever created has bad parts. its just a natural part of writing.
     
  8. Noya Desherbanté
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    Noya Desherbanté Senior Member

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    I would love to read an excerpt or example of this, it sounds fascinating :p I've always been a fan of good writing on its own merits (i.e. the style, not the story), and think historical dialects are wonderful to read, if done well.

    I think most of the difficulty with reading prose that's wildly different to 'normal' English usage is the phrase patterns (apologies if this isn't the right term) and general metre of the stuff. For instance, have you encountered A Clockwork Orange? The main character uses all sorts of made-up words, but you can still understand him, and I'm sure this is because of the patterning - people expecting certain words or ideas and seeing a fitting word, no matter how rare. I know it's vague but I hope you know what I mean :p put the emphasis on contemporary turns of phrase and singular words, while leaving the structure of the sentence unchanged. Perhaps write everything 'normally', then in the editing stage change as many words as you feel right into old-fashioned dialect, and see how it feels?

    I think the answer would ultimately be to post up a little part of it for people to comment on, and go from there. But I hope this helped a bit! :rolleyes:
     
  9. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    imo, the writing style should never overshadow the story... to write 'differently' just to be different won't get your book published, or sold to/read by many, should you take the vanity press route...
     
  10. digitig
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    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

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    There is a place for such works, but Finnegan's Wake has already been done and has set the bar high. And of course Joyce was already a major author when that was published.
     
  11. afrodite7
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    afrodite7 Senior Member

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    -just make sure your writing style goes hand and hand with your novel.don't do anything that would make it awkward or difficult.if you could,send me a sample of something so i can know specifically what you mean.
     

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