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  1. lameri
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    lameri Senior Member

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    Possessive?

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by lameri, Apr 20, 2011.

    What sounds better?
    1) We chose the In-N-Out in Auburn.
    2) We chose Auburn's In-N-Out.
    3) We chose the Auburn's In-N-Out.
    4) <something else>

    Thank you very much!
     
  2. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Whichever one fits the flow of your story better.

    The third one doesn't really work, unless you would normally refer to the Auburn. But for the city of Auburn, it doesn't fit.
     
  3. Froggy
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    Froggy Member

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    1) seems to be the more general use. (we were traveling and when we got hungry we chose the ...)
    2) would be if you had talked about canterbury's burger shack, and london's mcdonalds as alternatives. - or if you want to stress "Auburn's one and only food place - the in-n-out"...

    Can't really explain, but that's the meanin I am getting from them...
     
  4. lostinwebspace
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    lostinwebspace Active Member

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    I'm with the general consensus, but here's a question: Is there only one In-n-Out in Auburn? That's like saying "the McDonald's in Auburn."
     
  5. TheIllustratedMan
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    TheIllustratedMan Active Member

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    I would probably write it as "We chose the Auburn In-n-Out." Usually, even with large chains, that's how they're referred to. If there are more than one in town, you would throw in the street. For instance: "We chose the Route 99 In-n-Out in Auburn." or, if just telling a buddy, "We went to the In-n-Out out on 99: the one in Auburn."
    Generally, I would stick with the first one, unless you need to be more specific about it, then throw in the name of the road.

    ETA: I think from the thread title that you're mostly asking how to use a town name as a possessive. For me, I would just use it as an adjective.
     
  6. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Which is better. Butter Pecan or Maple Walnut?

    In other words, you only have to choose which one you prefer for one sitting. Neither the first nor the second is intrinsically better.

    As the writer, you get to choose. If you have trouble deciding, flip a coin and move on. The difference is not worth getting hung up on.
     
  7. madhoca
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    madhoca Contributing Member Contributor

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    There is a rationale for the choice, actually: we don't make possessives of things as often as we do when we talk about people. So, I prefer option (1), or illustrated man's suggestion: "We chose the Auburn In-n-Out" (that's if there is only ONE in-and-out there).
     
  8. lameri
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    lameri Senior Member

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    Thanks so much for your responses. I learned that "the Auburn's In-N-Out" didn't work, and it should be "the Auburn In-N-Out." I also notice now the subtle difference between 1) and 2), so thanks a lot!
     
  9. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    3 would be ok without the 'the'...
     
  10. digitig
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    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

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    I've picked up that Auburn is a city, I'm guessing that 'In-N-Out' is a restaurant or something. In which case (3) should be:
    We chose the Auburn In-N-Out.​
    Thing is, I've never heard of Auburn the city, so to me it's a hair colour (with an unexplained capital 'A'). It could also be a nickname for somebody with auburn hair, I suppose. In which case (2) and the amended (3) sound possibly rude. :redface:
     
  11. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    There is a city named Auburn within thirty miles of me.
     
  12. digitig
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    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

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    The nearest one I can find to me is over 4000 miles away.
     

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