1. Slappydappy
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    Slappydappy Member

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    Problem with creating a Fantasy novel

    Discussion in 'Fantasy' started by Slappydappy, Jan 19, 2012.

    Seems like these stories practically require you to create a vast world, complete with cities, countries, governments, etc. This seems so daunting. It looks like you will spend as much time creating the background of the story, as you will writing the story itself. And even worse if you plan to create multiple books.

    Does one have to go throuh this? I'm trying to think of some Fantasy novels that do not have very complex, detailed worlds.

    The reason I ask, is because I like more character driven stories, I don't care so much about creating a detailed world from scratch (but I will if I must).
     
  2. Cacian
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    Cacian Banned

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    well in that case why don't you just write out characters and place them in a play to interact between them an yourself.
    I am one who is not so keen on exterior or background decorations. That is something technology does best.
    I prefer spending time relating to my characters and bouncing them off each other for company if you see what I mean.
    No point in spending time on something you do not like nor care for or know how to.
    It is imperative for me to enjoy writing and not find it a taskfull otherwise I switch off which I do not want long term.
     
  3. TheWritingWriter
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    TheWritingWriter Senior Member

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    Just because you want to dabble in the genre of fantasy doesn't mean you have to limit yourselves to what other fantasy novels have given us. Most fantasy writers, myself included, enjoy creating a world and having their characters explore it. It's probably what makes the fantasy genre so fun! But who is to say that you have to focus a lot of time and energy on the world in your fantasy novel? Just throw them into a world, give them a name, write your story, and the world should create itself. The upside to a creating a world is it can be as fantastical or boring as you want it to be.
     
  4. kablooblab
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    kablooblab Member

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    I don't get it... I love creating worlds. But you can use things that everyone is already familiar with such as elves and vampires etc but put them in a real world place such as Europe at 1000AD or something that way the area, governments, and religion are all already in place. Just change it a little to add your mythological characters
     
  5. RomanticRose
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    RomanticRose Active Member

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    Urban fantasy is a nice blend. A story set in the modern world with fantasy elements.
     
  6. kablooblab
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    kablooblab Member

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    If only people would write urban fantasys that aren't love stories they could be so great
     
  7. JPGriffin
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    JPGriffin Senior Member

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    I can go on and on about the process of creating a world for your characters to run around in, the complex landscapes and the ancient lore you can include, but that's for someone looking to make a world. As a general rule, the setting needs to reflect the issues the main character is going through- this way, it will create itself, and seem perfectly natural. If he/she's in a chipper, bright mood, set them in a nice open valley or a bustling, bright city. If they're sad or depressed, add some rain or a few wildfires and you'll be all set. So, write your story, use a few underscores (___) if you don't have a name ready, and piece it together after the draft is done. Don't let the setting stop you, but write with a few gaps that you can fill in later on when you're feeling up to the challenge of making the world.

    As a side note, I'm going to have to disagree with RomanticRose (2 posts above^). Yes, it's often used well, but only if a person's been in an urban neighborhood to know the inner workings. A trip to Times Square isn't the same as travelling down every back alley in the "bad" part of the city. If you have the information, then use it by all means, but the ideals of fantasy are to be as creative as possible, in my opinion.
     
  8. RusticOnion
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    RusticOnion Contributing Member

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    Well I guess it depends on whether or not you want us to actually care about said world...
     
  9. ClusterChuck
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    ClusterChuck Senior Member

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    A fantasy novel doesn't have to be as deep and complex as Lord of the rings or A Song of Ice and Fire. It'll just be a different type of story. I can totally see 100,000 words around a set of characters bounding around a forest in the backwoods of some unspecified country of vaugely european tones. Throw in some soul searching and stargazing. Avoid the political upheaval and national warfare. End it all with your hero redeeming his earlier faults and burying his love interest on her father's land. Exit with the hero and his wounded companion of tragic comedic relief riding off into the vague horizon a little older and a little heartbroken. Give one a sword and one a bow. Have one 'oracle' scene in the second act. Then boom, you got a hefty fantasy epic without all the background and worrying about about how the economy works.
     
  10. AmyHolt
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    AmyHolt Contributing Member

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    What's wrong with romance? :)

    I think urban fantasy or fantasy grounded in reality is the best to write.
     
  11. Steerpike
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    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

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    Read the Dresden Files.
     

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