1. Sony-Shock
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    Sony-Shock New Member

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    Problem with developing first arc

    Discussion in 'Plot Development' started by Sony-Shock, Dec 5, 2015.

    Hello! I have this arc in a story of mine that I've never been sure how to handle. I can't find any other media that shows a situation like this (at least that is not a 'making characters be together so they fall in love with bad excuses' bad fanfiction) and I feel kind of lost. Could you give me a hand, maybe?

    The situation is that character A is a loyal and happy worker meanwhile character B is your typical edgy rebel to the system, even if they have a good reputation because of his origin.
    One day, when A tries to 'scold' B on his attitude, B replies to A saying their employeers are actually evil, that both of them and their kind are nothing but tools and furthermore: B states he will fight back and kill if necessary. Of course, A, being a loyal worker as he is, is horrorified.

    However, A still considers B is just wrong but not evil, so he develops a concern and paranoia for B's future. Scared that B could actually get crushed because of his beliefs and behavior.

    But before A has time to do anything, B's words are proven to be true and A, not wanting to die, although with regrets, escapes from their employeers.

    He seeks for B's help, who harshly denies it to him, not wanting to baby A.
    A then follows B, trying to convince him and asking sorry for his prejudge, which B finds only annoying (or so is implied, he is not the most easy to read). B tries to get rid of A with the help of a character C (who is in a position of power over B), who actually sees something in A and makes B forcefully take care of A not getting into trouble, although won't reveal his intentions.

    After this B still wants to keep distances and acts hateful towards A. B does not want to get any closer, meanwhile A acts aimable but frustrated.


    Okay, that said, the problem is this: I am scared the relationship between A and B could feel too parasitic or unconfortable, because of A insisting on getting B's help even if B obviously does not want to help him. It's very important since it is the first act and character A has to be the one the readers emphatize with the most, and at same time they should not hate B.

    Also I don't want their 'forced convivence' to be too monotone with a continuous 'Fail to get along' gag being repeated. This convivence does not take TOO long but its a considerable amount of time that could drag on and make the characters' traits be interpreted in the worst way (like: 'A is a parasitic coward' or 'B is a square-minded asshole'). I want to take advantage of this situation.

    Besides, further in the story they are supposed to become close, but under circunstances that do not affect this first arc. Those being that B and A were friends long ago but A's memories were deleted, so B decided to close himself (in case you consider I could leave an hint at this).

    A possible solution of mine is that during this convivence, A's attitude towards the situation reveals a nice trait of him that can make the reader emphatize, like being quite adaptable or considerate towards B (whereas B expected him to coward?) or loving with the relatives he has left behind, although those are just ideas. Although I don't want to glorify A too much because I want him to grow during the story.

    The tone of the story is not too serious or realistic, but I want the characters to be psychologically coherent. I intend it to be 'taken easy', even if it becomes dramatic later.

    Did I explain enough? Or should I be more specific on the context? Thanks!

    Also excuse my gramatic, I am not an english speaker! My co-author is.
     
  2. BayView
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    BayView Contributing Member Contributor

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    I think you can do a lot of this through POV. If we're in A's POV, you can show his doubts/thoughts/intentions, and should have no trouble liking him. Honestly, even just from your description I liked A a lot better than B, who seems like a sullen ass.

    If you're planning on a different POV, it might be more challenging, but if you're in A's POV, I wouldn't worry about it.
     
  3. Sony-Shock
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    Sony-Shock New Member

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    Oooh, thanks! Well, A's POV was going to be it! I'm very pleased to hear it! B softens his attitude in later arcs. Partly because both end fighting partially for the same goal and B isn't stupid enough to sabotage it out of a tantrum, and later on because he actually reveals he was avoiding being hurt.

    Do you think it's dangerous to make B unlikeable in the first arc? Or would that be effective for a reverse psychology effect? (Showing him being an ass, then revealing nice traits about him). You think there's a limit of time I should respet to keep his unreachable status before the reader gets tired of an unhealthy-relationship? (After all, when a character is in absolute denial like this, the plot can't advance in its direction)
     
  4. BayView
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    BayView Contributing Member Contributor

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    Are you shooting for a romance between A and B, or just a working partnership?

    If a working partnership, I don't think there's any problem with making him unlikeable. But if you're looking for a romance, I think you have to balance B's asshole-ishness in the first part against his repentance in the second part. If the relationship is a major part of the story, no problem, but if it's just a tiny part, it may take more words than you want to spend to have him redeemed if you make him too tough like in the first part.
     
  5. Sony-Shock
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    Sony-Shock New Member

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    Partnership. Friendship, actually! And it's so important that the sub-plots are thought to enhance their bond and make the revelation at the end more meaningful. Both characters get to meet other characters and face other problems with their auto-conclusive story, but the consequences of these sub-plots lead to a situation where A and B emphatize with each other because both went throught similar situations during the plot in the first place. (In a blunt way: Everyone dies and A and B realise both wished things went other way, enhancing the bond they had formed after B stopped being so selfish, and this enhanced bond triggers a reveal that gives the care A had for B in the beginning of the story a reason, which enhances their relationship even more

    So... Rant apart... That is actually reassuring to hear. Which I appreciate a lot. Thanks!
     

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