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  1. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    Psychiatry, the Media and Vogue

    Discussion in 'Debate Room' started by Wreybies, Nov 13, 2013.

    In the 60's it was all about schizophrenia.
    The 70's embraced Dissociative Identity Disorder (Multiple Personality Disorder)
    The 80's brought us the generation of Obsessive Compulsive Behavior Disorder
    The 90's was the era of ADHD
    In the 2000's Social Anxiety Disorder is what everyone is talking about from behind their computer screens.

    Topic: Does media and culture merely expose disorders in their true rate of presentation, or does the conversation create a vogue of fashionable maladies out of proportion with true rates of presentation?

    My take is the latter, and it bugs me because I feel like people who ride the wave of psychiatric vogue belittle and trivialize the situation for people who truly suffer from disorders.
     
  2. Steerpike
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    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

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    The latter. And it seems to me we over-medicate, particularly when it comes to children.
     
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  3. thirdwind
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    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

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    Agreed in full. As an aside, I've realized that it's fairly easy to fake the symptoms of some disorders, which leads to a false diagnosis for a lot of cases.
     
  4. We Are Cartographers
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    We Are Cartographers Active Member

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    .
     
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  5. obsidian_cicatrix
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    obsidian_cicatrix I ink, therefore I am. Contributor

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    I'd say the latter.

    Certainly. I'm sure we all have acquaintances who at the mention of a condition will rush to Google and then convince themselves they have all the symptoms. And then there are those that play the sick card for financial gain. Don't get me started on that.

    In the last ten years I've become very upfront about my illness. I hid the fact from employers for years, to my own detriment, partially because of the way the media handled the subject. It might be argued that the media can achieve a lot by demystifying psychiatric conditions, but even a subject picked up in the story line of a t.v. soap opera, (because the media are pushing it as a 'poster' illness) can be handled badly and end up hurting the sufferers, instead of benefiting them.

    The BBC chose to include a bi polar character in the soap opera Eastenders. Coincdentally, this came about roughly the time Stephen Fry was 'outed.' Now as much as I appreciate that the part was obviously researched—I could feel Jean's 'ups' and 'downs'— I disliked the way her illness was often played for comedic value.
    Exactly. It's not so funny when you're the one suffering from it.
     
  6. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    The 2010s - Debilitating Disorder of the Decade Disorder.
     
  7. Jack Asher
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    Jack Asher Wildly experimental Contributor

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    2010's is all about the autism spectrum
     
  8. HarleyQ.
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    HarleyQ. Just a Little Pit Bull (female)

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    The latter. People are often left not knowing that the criteria for mental disorders aren't all that matters when diagnosing, and I think the media doesn't do a very good job explaining that.
     
  9. TessaT
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    TessaT Contributing Member

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    I say the latter. One that fully gets to me is that 'obesity' is now considered a disease. I disagree with this, whole-heartedly, as a fatter person. Obesity, if anything, is a symptom, of other illness, which can cause other problems (back pain, depression, knee issues, etc). But there's always a reason WHY someone is obese. Whether it's simply a lack of healthy eating and exercise, depression (leading to eating disorders), thyroids, etc... someone is not obesity itself is not a disease. I mention this because I'm on a weight-loss forum as well, and as soon as that decision was made... suddenly everyone had a 'disease'. It went from being their responsibility, to being out of their hands. It was an excuse to not hold themselves responsible for their weight. It wasn't their fault... they have a disease.

    I feel it's a little bit of the same with mental illnesses. I've known people who were depressed and coping with it, suddenly are officially diagnosed, and things CHANGED. They couldn't do ABC because they were DEPRESSED. I didn't understand how they were feeling because I'd never been DEPRESSED. (Little did they know that I do...) I've seen this in family members as well. Suddenly they're diagnosed and rather than dealing with the issues that may cause the depression, they're told to cover it up with lots of medication.

    I'm glad that people are able to go out and seek the needed help, but I wish it wasn't so easy for them to get medicated treatment unless it's actually needed. Instead of suggesting therapy, my doctor went straight to the drugs, and I know many others do as well. So yes, both people with the illness and doctors are abusing the system that should be helping people.
     
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  10. Jack Asher
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    Jack Asher Wildly experimental Contributor

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    You are making a very common mistake between clinical depression and feeling a little down sometimes. In cases of clinical depression the sufferer is has decreased sensitivity in all of their nerve endings. This includes receptors in the brain. They are not so much depressed as they are incapable of feeling. Psychology can bring as much help with a broken arm as it can with a broken brain.
    This is the best explanation I have ever seen about it.
     
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  11. TessaT
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    TessaT Contributing Member

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    That's sort of my point. If a doctor says that you're depressed, a lot of people see that as being diagnosed as 'clinically depressed'. People who are 'feeling a little down' are now being told that they're depressed and need medication for it, when in reality, some exercise and therapy could probably greatly benefit them. I think that a psychologist who actually knows what they're talking about can help someone with depression. I know it won't work for everyone (nothing ever does), but I feel that its better to start there then immediately to the drugs. As someone who went through a couple extreme years of depression (and suffers still, but thankfully more regulated), I know that I won't understand every single person's depression and how it affects them, but I do feel that I have some understanding of how it affects a person and what it can do to them.
     
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