1. grimmwriter
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    grimmwriter Member

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    Publishing Process for Graphic Novel Scripts?

    Discussion in 'Publishing' started by grimmwriter, Mar 28, 2011.

    Hi all,

    I am participating in Script Frenzy this April, and I have decided to format my work as a graphic novel. But I was wondering about what to do when I finish it?

    Do I submit it as is to an agent like a regular manuscript? Or am I responsible for paying for all the artwork before hand? Or do I need a few sample pages to submit along with the script?

    Thanks so much for any input!
     
  2. NateSean
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    NateSean Active Member

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    With a graphic novel, you really need to do your legwork. Because the company you approach is already going to have a ton of people on their payroll who can write scripts.

    Those graphic novels and manga you see in the bookstore, or your local library? Almost all of them began as weeks and months worth of drawing and writing in the artist's home.

    So if this is your first attempt at scripting a graphic novel and you're worried about your artistic skills then my best advice to you is to find an artist who is willing to do the legwork of drawing the first volume for you.

    You may have to invest a little in this one and actually pay the artist. Or, if the artist thinks he or she is up to working with you on future projects, you can present the finished product as a joint project. Beyond that, I imagine the process is much like shopping a regular manuscript, only now your artwork and ability to tell a story through drawings and images is going to be scrutinized as well.

    One big suggestion I hear from a lot of web comic artists is to visit comic book conventions. They usually have a place set up specifically for aspiring graphic novelists to present their work.

    Oh...and stear clear of Toyko Pop.
     
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  3. grimmwriter
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    grimmwriter Member

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    Thanks so much for your answer! I'll admit it wasn't what I was hoping for, but I figured as much. I guess once I finish the script I'll go out and see if I can find an artist willing to work with me on it.

    I have no money to really put into this yet, so I'm hoping I can find an art student or someone that will work on faith that it will get published.

    Just curious, do you know what the percentages are for that? Like how much each person gets? I want to know when I ask around, how much I should promise the artist. I'm guessing their portion would be 70 or more percent.
     
  4. w176
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    w176 Contributing Member Contributor

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    Unless an artist know that the comic will sell any artist will want to get paid. If you want an artist professional enough to be worth paying, and I'm not talking about quality of artwork here but being just professional enough, like actually doing the work, we talking at least 100 $ per page. For any art student it would be extremely unprofessional to not charge a real rate for their work.

    Especially if you recruited someone to do you dirty work and not as a part of a team having a say in the creative process.
     
  5. grimmwriter
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    grimmwriter Member

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    Thank you for the honesty, I really appreciate it. I have no problem with paying them or their work, and I know they deserve to be. I just don't have the money right now. So maybe it would be best for me to sit on the script so to speak until I can come up with the funds.
     
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  6. NateSean
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    NateSean Active Member

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    As for percentages and what everyone gets paid, I'm no math whiz. I guess it depends on who you get published with.

    And the trouble with getting something for free is that you get what you paid for. So if you're going for publication quality, you will need to work out a professional relationship with any artist you work with.

    Relationships like this are alway sketchy. (Even if you are related to the artist, *cough*mybrother*cough*) Because the artist is going to put his or her priorities ahead of yours. So if money is an issue right now, I would suggest this.

    Write out your story. Not in script form, but as a regular story. Then shop it around and if it's good enough to sell as a graphic novel or a manga, your publisher will contact the artists and do the work for you.

    Anne Rice, James Patterson, and Sherrilyn Kenyon have all had their literary works translated into graphic formats. Even Stephen King's Dark Tower series is making it's rounds in comic book shops. So it's not such a stretch for you to try to take the long way around.
     

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