1. Rei
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    Rei Contributing Member Contributor

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    Question on Submitting

    Discussion in 'Publishing' started by Rei, Aug 6, 2008.

    I'm in an interesting situation with a local publisher I would like to submit my work to. I'm getting some assistance from an employment program that has its office on the same floor as the publisher. Is there any way I could introduce myself to them or even hand in a submission right there without looking like an over-eager amature?
     
  2. Cheeno
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    Cheeno Contributing Member

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    I would say, "What harm?" Worse comes to worse, they can only say no. In saying that, apart from guaranteeing the publisher is suitable, I would ensure you have your material 'ready' before any approach. Don't rely on your own opinion either, there's nothing worse than realising 'after the fact' that your ms isn't as 'ready' as you'd thought. After you've finished your final edit, have it reviewed/proofed by someone you trust, then go through it again, just to be sure. Once you've submitted it there's no going back. Good luck.:)
     
  3. TWErvin2
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    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

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    Rei,

    There are a number of factors, the first of which is the type of submissions that they accept. If they don't generally accept or don't prefer hard copies, then right off it probably would not benefit you.

    Another factor would be how well you meet and greet, and the impression you'll likely leave. That considered, how likely is it you'll meet/speak with one of the editors? Are they a big enough publisher that they'd have a secretary/receptionist/office manager? Not that the individual up front won't make a positive (or negative) observation or comment.

    As I see it, if they accept hard copy and you feel comfortable, there is nothing wrong with hand-delivering a submission, realizing that it may be little more than you indicating that you were in the area and have a manuscript (or submission package) you'd like to submit for consideration.

    Needless to say, have it prepared in an envelope, addressed, with cover letter and everything else. Make sure you check the guidelines before you prepare the package. If you can, find out who the editors are, by name...and if one of the names looks tricky, find out (even via a friendly inquiry phone call) how to pronounce it.

    Dress appropriately, practice in the mirror a few times what you intend to say...even maybe if you will deliver it to an editor, have a quick 15-30 second pitch ready, on the off chance while delivering your manuscript, an editor asks what your novel is about. And above all, smile.

    I know, some common sense stuff there, but first impressions can make a difference.

    Good luck on whatever route you take.

    Terry
     
  4. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    all good advice... and you're wise to not ignore a 'manna drop' that obvious... but i'd be very sure your material is ready to be seen, before doing an 'over the transom' bit... i'll be glad to give it a look, if you want...

    love and hugs, maia
    maia3maia@hotmail.com
     
  5. Rei
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    Rei Contributing Member Contributor

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    Well, I am going to be posting parts of it on here to get some feedback.
     
  6. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    In that case, you should limit how much you post, so you can still have First Publication right on the bargaining table.
     
  7. NaCl
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    NaCl Contributing Member Contributor

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    I spent MANY years building a strong sponsor base during my pro bass fishing years. I picked up such notables as Evnirude, Bass Cat Boats, Yamamoto Baits and Dobyns Rods. Along the way, I learned the fundamental rule about approaching sponsors. Do not tell them what you need; ask them what they need!

    Just like aspiring writers, the bass fishing industry is chock full of "good" talent from which sponsors can pick and choose. Most "newbies" make the mistake of asking for lots of free stuff or cash support (because that is what they need), and then - almost as an afterthought - they throw in a general statement about how hard they will "work" to represent the sponsor. Wrong approach!

    The right approach is to study the sponsor's business before approaching them and learn about their business needs. Then, the fisherman's presentation should begin and end with the business needs of the sponsor, with a brief explanation in the middle about how the fisherman can help the sponsor achieve more sales.

    I don't see where a publishing company is any different . . . they're interested in selling books and you're interested in "sponsorship".
     
  8. Rei
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    Rei Contributing Member Contributor

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    I don't know if I could get up the courage to do it anyway.
     
  9. Cheeno
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    Cheeno Contributing Member

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    Deep breath, deep breath:) No doubting how stressful it can be, but there's only one way to do it and that's to...do it! Get some feedback on your material, from the forums or wherever suits, and then you'll at least see where you stand in relation to its state of readiness. Good luck.
     

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