1. The95Writer
    Offline

    The95Writer Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2014
    Messages:
    118
    Likes Received:
    10

    Realise or Realize?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by The95Writer, Mar 27, 2014.

    I am from Wales (Britain) and I prefer to use 'realise'. The same applies for other words that have an alteration between an 'S' and a 'Z'. Is this okay for writing books? I looked-up that it is neither correct nor incorrect. And, what other examples are there that have a letter difference between an 'S' and a 'Z'
     
  2. jannert
    Offline

    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    7,821
    Likes Received:
    7,345
    Location:
    Scotland
    As a Yank who has lived in Scotland for yonks, I've encountered this many times. In general Americans (and maybe others?) would use 'realize.' British people (and maybe others) use 'realise.' I've slipped into the British usage, myself. Both are correct. However, they both might look strange to somebody from the wrong side of the Big Pond.

    British spellings differ from American spellings a lot more that people realise. Like 'traveler' and 'traveller.' It's not all about adding a 'u' in color, neighbor, etc. Or spelling diarrhea with 3/4 of the known alphabet thrown in for good measure...
     
    jazzabel likes this.
  3. Thomas Kitchen
    Offline

    Thomas Kitchen Proofreader in the Making Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2012
    Messages:
    1,258
    Likes Received:
    422
    Location:
    I'm Welsh - and proud!
    It depends where you want your work to be published, if it ends up that way. If America, then use 'z', and if Britain, then use 's'. Remember it's also words that are different: pavement and sidewalk, lorry and truck, kitchen paper and kitchen towel, etc.

    And hello, fellow Welshie. ;) Chi'n siarad Cymraeg?
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2014
  4. Komposten
    Offline

    Komposten Insanitary pile of rotten fruit Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2012
    Messages:
    1,584
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    Sweden
    That's interesting, I really need to take a look at this. I knew about the s/z-thing, the u-thing and some word differences, but I've never really considered "obvious" spelling such as 'traveller' vs. 'traveler', etc. I'd suspect I am using a mix of everything, having had a bunch of different English teachers who probably have used different accents.


    Another problem similar to s/z: In British English, do you write 'advise' or 'advice', and 'advised' or 'adviced'?
     
  5. plothog
    Offline

    plothog Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2013
    Messages:
    639
    Likes Received:
    514
    Location:
    England
    Realise is the British spelling. Realize is American. There are quite a few words where the Americans use 'Z' and we use 'S'.
    The ones which spring to mind are organise and civlised.

    The advice I've seen on these forums previously said something along the lines that because you're British and likely to submit your work to British publishers initially, use the British spellings.
     
  6. plothog
    Offline

    plothog Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2013
    Messages:
    639
    Likes Received:
    514
    Location:
    England
    Advise is the verb. Advice is a noun.
    "I would advise you to listen to my advice."
    I don't think adviced is a word.
     
    Renee J and jannert like this.
  7. plothog
    Offline

    plothog Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2013
    Messages:
    639
    Likes Received:
    514
    Location:
    England
    Though confusingly, sometimes British spelling does use 'C' instead of 'S'. Defence rather than defense is the example I can think of.
     
  8. jannert
    Offline

    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    7,821
    Likes Received:
    7,345
    Location:
    Scotland
    Advise is a verb. It's what you do when you give advice to people. Advice is a noun. They're not interchangeable, either side of the Pond. There is no such word as 'adviced.'
     
    Komposten likes this.
  9. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    be advised that is good advice!
     
    jazzabel and jannert like this.
  10. Mike Kobernus
    Offline

    Mike Kobernus Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2013
    Messages:
    301
    Likes Received:
    127
    Location:
    Norway
    Just do what you are comfortable with, and be consistent.
     
  11. Komposten
    Offline

    Komposten Insanitary pile of rotten fruit Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2012
    Messages:
    1,584
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    Sweden
    Thank you both for your answers! I've definitely learned something new today.
    My thought behind 'adviced' was that it was a possible spelling of past time for 'advice' (had it been a verb rather than a noun).
     
  12. jannert
    Offline

    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    7,821
    Likes Received:
    7,345
    Location:
    Scotland
    So, defeat of deduct went over defence before detail must be a British true-ism, then...???
     
  13. Komposten
    Offline

    Komposten Insanitary pile of rotten fruit Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2012
    Messages:
    1,584
    Likes Received:
    670
    Location:
    Sweden
    I'm lost here, is that sentence (defeat of ... ) supposed to mean something? :confused:
     
  14. jannert
    Offline

    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    7,821
    Likes Received:
    7,345
    Location:
    Scotland
    Sorry, it's a silly thing we used to repeat a lot when we were children. But if you're from Sweden, you might not 'hear' it the same way we did. We used to think this was terribly funny.

    Try: The feet (defeat) of the duck (deduct) went over the fence (defence) before the tail (detail).

    Ever try to explain a joke? It doesn't work...o_O

    Especially if the joke is crap...
     
    Komposten likes this.
  15. plothog
    Offline

    plothog Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2013
    Messages:
    639
    Likes Received:
    514
    Location:
    England
    Aha I was confused too:)
    You have to say it out loud for it to make any sense.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2014
  16. The95Writer
    Offline

    The95Writer Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2014
    Messages:
    118
    Likes Received:
    10
    I plan on getting it published in the UK mainly but I wouldn't mind attempting to get my books published in the USA also.
    And, sadly - I can't speak fluent Welsh. Only the rudimentary phrases and sentences haha. Where in Wales are you from? I am from Cardiff.
     
  17. Thomas Kitchen
    Offline

    Thomas Kitchen Proofreader in the Making Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2012
    Messages:
    1,258
    Likes Received:
    422
    Location:
    I'm Welsh - and proud!
    Not everyone has to speak Welsh - you're okay. ;) I'm from Carmarthen, so not that far from you. I hope to move to Cardiff in a couple of years, unless plans change (which they probably will, because that's life!). A nice apartment would be great. :)
     
  18. David K. Thomasson
    Offline

    David K. Thomasson Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2013
    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    122
    Location:
    Lynchburg, Virginia
    Here is the definitive answer.
     
  19. Bjørnar Munkerud
    Offline

    Bjørnar Munkerud Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    Messages:
    393
    Likes Received:
    140
    Location:
    Oslo, Norway
    I'd suggest writing it your way and then self-published it just like you wrote it if you're doing that, let your editor discuss with you (and probably change it if they so desire; I see no real way you'd really want to fight this one) whether or not it should be changed for publication in your local area, and the same with those responsible for its publishing abroad if you're doing that. So, all in all, simply write it the way you want to write it, because you're the author, and then let the ediotors be editors and edit if that's the appropriate action. I see no real reason to know or care about other spelling conventions than your own when writing.
     

Share This Page