1. ecanusia16
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    ecanusia16 Member

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    Run-On Sentences

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by ecanusia16, Sep 21, 2008.

    Hey all... I just got a recent work reviewed and I realize I am addicted to run-on sentences. Am I the only one having problems like this? Sometimes I get way over my head and I tend to go on and on and on. Bad habit *tsk tsk* There's a real problem where a sentence should stop and begin, or how much info it should carry. Can anyone suggest ways to overcome this?
     
  2. Kratos
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    Kratos Contributing Member

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    Try reading it aloud and if it sounds natural, then it's probably ok. Whenever you would pause in a sentence, (note the comma to the left), put in a comma. If you're about to list things, put in a colon. And if you're going to put in two ideas, put in a semicolon.

    And I'm not sure if this is in the right section...
     
  3. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    First off, a run-on sentence is not a proper sentence. It's two or more sentences jammed end to end without con cluding punctuation on the leading sentences.

    However, too many compound sentences, or overly complex sentences, are a style problem even though syntactically correct.

    A sentence should convey a single complete piece of information. A good compound sentence relates closely related pieces of information, and should usually be limited to two clauses.

    Sentence length and complexity affects the pace of the story. Long, complex sentences slow down the pace, and are best used when the story needs to pass time. The chaqracters may be sitting around, paying attention to detail as they rest or wait for someone.

    High actiion should race ahead. Use short sentences. Avoid description. Keep it moving! An occasional longer sentence may help the flow by adding variety. Just don't overdo it.
     
  4. Ommonite
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    Ommonite Senior Member

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    I've had the problem. Having others read it aloud as well will check to see if it is trying to say to much.
     
  5. ecanusia16
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    ecanusia16 Member

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    Usually, my run-on sentences don't happen in exposition. They appear when I rant (1st-person POV), or when a character does the exposition for the story (as in dialogue).
     
  6. Ommonite
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    Ommonite Senior Member

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    Or when the writer forgets its a narrative and starts ranting.
     

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