1. Nathalie
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    Nathalie New Member

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    self publish or go to publisher?

    Discussion in 'Publishing' started by Nathalie, Jan 3, 2009.

    any info appreciated. any info on selling on amazon too appreciated. thanks
     
  2. robertpaine
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    robertpaine Member

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    Go to a publisher, they take care of everything there, it's so much easier on you, and if you go through an agent and still you don't get accepted by any publishers then the likelyhood is, self publishing will be a waste of your time.
     
  3. TWErvin2
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    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

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    This question comes up quite often.

    Best choice, in my opinion is to submit to agents and/or publishers directly. Start at the top and work your way down. It'll take time, sure. While you're submitting, write another novel.

    If you get some bites--requests for partials or full manuscript, it will at least tell you that your writing is good quality. The bottom line is that even if you self-publish, and your writing is sub-par, you won't sell much beyond a circle of family and friends. And even if the writing is par or above--you'd better be ready to invest time and money in marketing to reach readers...not an hour here and there, and five dollars here and there either.

    Just my two cents.

    Terry
     
  4. Scarecrow28
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    Scarecrow28 Contributing Member

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    Go to a publisher. It is a lot simpler and the actual publishing process is their responsibility, instead of yours.
     
  5. TWErvin2
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    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

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    I agree with Scarecrow28, however I'd like to stress (in my view and hopefully Scarecrow28's) that you should submit to publishers that pay you, not vanity publishers (those you pay to publish your work).

    Legitimate publishers have a process where they accept the best submissions, rejecting all others. They have editors that work to improve the piece. They also have some method to distribute your work...the larger the publisher and the greater distribution--and people paid/active in pushing your work to brick and mortar stores--and marketing, the better.

    Terry
     
  6. Etan Isar
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    Etan Isar Contributing Member Contributor

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    Go to a publisher or agent. Self-publishing is rarely profitable, always difficult. One of the most important parts of the deal with a real publisher is the marketing. They have clout, they have resources, they have respect. Unless you are publishing for a niche market, such as local history, where a publisher is unlikely to be interested, self-publishing is unlikely to be your best choice.
     
  7. Nathalie
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    Nathalie New Member

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    thanks everyone. so everyone is suggesting a publisher.

    i was a bit worried how to work out the print run otherwise but as i am also from a sales background selling/marketing does not worry me either. i suppose I find it difficult to understand how the whole publishing field for print runs and the whole contacts process would work.
     
  8. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    is this a non-fiction book for which you have an established built-in market?... if not, you'd best listen to terry, as fiction won't sell enough to cover your expenses, regardless of your sales experience... the rare few exceptions, like redfield's mess that oprah touted after he self-published are more in the 'miracle' class than anything...
     
  9. Etan Isar
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    Etan Isar Contributing Member Contributor

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    There are a lot of great places to learn about how publishing works, especially agent blogs and publisher websites. As for marketing, the question is more if you have the time, money, and conacts to get your stuff in stores, than even experience in part of the field. Also, the advice here is only applicable to fiction. For a non-fiction work, self-publishing might be the way to go.
     
  10. Nathalie
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    Nathalie New Member

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    this is a non fiction book. so if non fiction are you still saying publishers...?

    thanks everso for your help mammamaia too.
     
  11. Nathalie
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    Nathalie New Member

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    hi there Etan just got your message as i was writing a

    reply. so would self publishing be the way then on this front?thanks everso
     
  12. NaCl
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    NaCl Contributing Member Contributor

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    I have thirty plus year experience in marketing and sales. In 2008, I decided to take the plunge on self publishing so I bought all the appropriate permits/programs and licenses. I contracted for printing, binding, cover art and editing. When everything was done, I approached the distribution system (Barnes & Noble, Amazon, Borders, etc) and discovered it is a closed club...most won't take self published works and ALL of them take 55% of the cover price of your book for the "privilege" of selling it through their stores. That means you must be able to make a profit on the remaining 45%...and that's assuming you got good enough deals on printing and binding to price the book "at the market."

    Since, the vanity press and POD publishers are automatically rejected by the distribution system, you must come up with another way to sell your books. In my case, I created an actual publishing company so they granted me an exception as a "small/specialty press publisher" and Barnes & Noble placed their first order about a week ago....after six months of jumping through their requirement hoops.

    To date, I've spent over $6000 on this adventure and sold a little over 200 books bringing in $2000+ using creative marketing. Now, I am preparing a national marketing campaign to sell the rest through traditional stores. I would NOT recommend this approach to anyone else who 1) does not have plenty of money to risk, 2) does not understand the book distribution system and 3) is not willing to invest hundreds of hours in management/marketing activities. I am confident of making a profit in 2009 but I'm not sure the time demands are worth it...they have taken me completely OUT of writing.
     
  13. Nathalie
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    Nathalie New Member

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    Hiya Naci thanks everso for your input. was thinking if i were to

    go down this route i would have to set up as a publisher and yes the cost seems horrendous i think you are right. if can be of assistance in uk please do not hesitate. thanks again.
     
  14. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    still need an answer to my question, before this can be answered:

     
  15. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Go to a publisher. If you have to ask the question, you are really not prepared for all the aspects of publishing you will need to know. Even if you are "pretty sure" you want to self-publish, you are almost certainly not adequately prepared.

    If nothing else, you will need to consult with a literary attorney on a number of issues. If you go to a publishing house, they will have their own legal department to ake care of those matters for you.
     

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