1. Public
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    Simple writing question?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Public, Jun 22, 2012.

    Umm I was wondering when you write a story starting at the end of the story, and kinda showing a looking back kinda sense to the start and writing from there, to end the first chapter and you want to bring back to the end to finish the chapter with, how would you do that? I know its kinda confusing, dont know how to better explain it.

    I'm doing it in this kind of context.

    “Alright” I headed towards my desk to grab my bag and as I walked out the door, “bye.”
    “Bye bye”
    Now that I have an idea on how I want to introduce myself to the morning class, I feel ready for tomorrow.

    From there I want to add in one more line skipping all the way to the end of the story and be on the lines of:
    Looking back at it now I really was nervous about...
    Do I have to show some sort of time difference or do I just add that one liner in?
     
  2. Youniquee
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    Youniquee (◡‿◡✿) Contributor

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    I did something like this before but I'll probably take it out. I had a scene from the end of the novel and did a one liner similar to that...then had a chapter break. After that, I started from the beginning of the story.
    You could mention the date (if possible) or maybe a season change to show the time has gone 'backwards' if you want do.

    Any reason why you want to start it from the ending? Sometimes this can confusing to reader to be honest.

    Hope this helped.
     
  3. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    A change in time implies a change of scene. Scene transitions need to be managed carefully so the reader can make the transition with you.

    Minor scene transitions can simply begin with a new paragraph, if the opening sentence of the new paragraph signals the transition.

    Major transitions should either begin a new chapter, or be separated from the preceding scene with a section break, signified in manuscript by a single line containing only a centered '#' character.

    A scene change out of chronological order is a rather major transition.
     
  4. ulubelu
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    ulubelu Member

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    My book is going to be like that! I haven't actually written the scene just yet, but I know that it is going to be along these kind of lines:

    Hayden looked up, and gave Logan a forced, yet weak smile, but he was cut off mid-smile by a cough. Blood. Logan's trembling hands reached up to wipe the blood from his younger brother's mouth. 'How did we end up here, Haddy? How did we go from peace to war?'

    'Well,' Hayden said, his voice nothing more than a bare whisper. 'It started with a sunflower.'

    And then in the next chapter we're taken back to the beginning - where Hayden is picking sunflowers, and then you'll get a good story out of their journey to the point, where one of them is lying dying in the other brother's arms. Or something like that ;)
     
  5. Program
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    I'm not sure I quite understand your question. It looks like you are asking how to put in a past event in a chapter that is about the present?

    If your story is going to change the time somewhere, use something to make the out-of-order event look "different." It could be a page break, a line break, a change in tense, a change in tone, a change in font, etc. (or any combination). Readers should then understand what's happening. I don't know if your one-liner will work, but that depends on the context it's in, but you didn't provide enough of the text.
     

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