1. Michelle7
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    Michelle7 Member

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    Skimpy Ms

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Michelle7, Oct 25, 2012.

    I have heard that beginning writers usually write too much and have to cut out a lot of what they put in their first draft. But, I am finding that I am actually writing to little. I dont put in enough detail and i dont expand enough. For example, I get an idea and I write that then another idea and I write that. But I'm having trouble expanding on those ideas so it looks like I'm actually rushing through my Ms. Does anyone have any suggestions on how I can fix this?:confused:
     
  2. jwatson
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    jwatson Active Member

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    This is a common problem.

    I suggest you put more thought into your story's plot. Create subplots between characters and the overall plot. This will get you to the stage where you write too much, and then you will proceed to cut a lot of stuff. It's all part of the process. Don't stress over it, enjoy it.
     
  3. EdFromNY
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    EdFromNY Hope to improve with age Supporter Contributor

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    Are you writing a novel-length story, novella or short story? The expectations for each are different.

    Assuming it's a novel, are you working from an outline, or just "writing where the story takes you"? It sounds like it might be the latter. Writing one idea at a time makes it difficult to add subplots, while doing an outline first allows you to identify subplot opportunities. It also allows you to change your story as you go without doing massive rewrites. If you don't want to do an outline, per se, you can use the work product that you have now as a kind of outline and then look for ways to flesh it out.

    Good luck.
     
  4. peachalulu
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    peachalulu Contributing Member Reviewer Contributor

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    The ultimate goal of a story is usually not the story but the problems faced in reaching the
    goal. This is the meat. When things are too simply got or solved it’s not really a story it’s an
    incident.

    Take Romancing the Stone for example. The idea behind it is simple. A romance writer Joan Wilder learns her sister Elaine has been kidnaped.
    Elaine’s husband was murdered recently but before he died he mailed Joan a treasure map. The kidnappers want the treasure map and order
    Joan to bring it to them in Columbia. That’s it that the goal. Sounds simple - all she has to do is hop a plane and give them the map.

    Wrong, there would be no story if it was that simple.

    Joan is a bit of a flake giving the writer opportunity - so when she lands in Columbia, she gets on the wrong bus
    ( with a little help for a second bad guy who’s after the map as well. )
    Well, getting on the wrong bus doesn’t sound so bad, plus it’s an easy fix get on the right bus and head in the proper direction.
    But the story would end too fast.

    The bus crashes.
    Good, and instead of following the peasants up the road Joan stays behind with the bad guy nearly gets killed but is rescued by a shadowy hunk.
    Perfect but now things can run smoothly.

    Not quite, the hunk isn’t dashing, he’s in it for the money and wants to find the treasure himself.
    The story has just turned from a simple delivery into high adventure, and romance. With Joan
    emerging as an uptight flake, to a willowy beauty the heroine of her own lusty romance.

    And the twists and turns just keep coming. When you think of an idea, create a character that
    can't just rush in and get to his or her goal. Think of twists, turns, obstacles. Allow description to flesh things out
    and create vibrant scenes. Use the five senses - think of precise words and images not just generalizations.
     
  5. Michelle7
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    Michelle7 Member

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    Thanks guys for the replies. It is a novel and yes, I was just trying to go by the seat of my pant per se. I really do need to create subplots, I guess I'm not giving that as much attention. Thanks again.

    Michelle
     
  6. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    also, michelle, do more reading of good writing... by doing that, you will see what it is yours lacks...
     

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