1. AngeloBraxton
    Offline

    AngeloBraxton Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2009
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0

    Skipping a work day?

    Discussion in 'Plot Development' started by AngeloBraxton, Jul 14, 2009.

    My character has just started working for the day and nothing interesting that would move the plot along in any way, shape, or form is going to happen so I've decided it would just be better to skip to work day. But how would I do this? I have an extreme case of writer's block and can't seem to think of any good way to skip this particular scene.
     
  2. Anders Backlund
    Offline

    Anders Backlund Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Land of Lagom
    What's the profession in question, specifically?

    If you want your characters to do something they normally wouldn't do, the best way is usually to force them. Most normal people would just stick around and do their job, so try to find a way to make it more important for this character to be somewhere else then staying at work.

    Anyway, unless his workplace plays an important part in the plot, you don't even need to dwell on it. If it has no purpose, maybe he doesn't even make it to work, getting sidetracked along the way. Or if you want to use the workplace to establish something about the character (for example, that he finds his work unfulfilling) you could just write a paragraph or two about how he goes to work, spends some time working and then goes home feeling unfulfilled.

    Basically, if the readers don't need to read about it, and probably won't enjoy reading about it, there's no point writing a lot about it.
     
  3. TWErvin2
    Offline

    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
    Messages:
    2,528
    Likes Received:
    561
    Location:
    Ohio, USA
    Why even mention it if it's not important. You don't have to account for every minute of a character's life. Pick up on the drive home...or whatever else is relevant to the plot and moves things forward.

    Terry
     
  4. AngeloBraxton
    Offline

    AngeloBraxton Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2009
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0
    I should have been more specific. He needs to go to work so his boss can show him a vintage shotgun which he eventually steals and kills a bunch of people with. After his boss shows him the gun, nothing else happens at work.
     
  5. Anders Backlund
    Offline

    Anders Backlund Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Land of Lagom
    Then focus on what matters; the gun, and whatever reasons this guy has to go on a killing spree. Have him dwell on that. Again, you don't have to pay much attention to his actual workday unless that's somehow important or something vital happens during it.
     
  6. Cogito
    Offline

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    35,935
    Likes Received:
    2,043
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    So why does the character go postal? Maybe he catches wind that someone is about to be fired, and he thinks it is going to be him. Maybe his boss puts him on probation for poor performance, or for something he knows is really the fault of one of his co-workers?
     
  7. AngeloBraxton
    Offline

    AngeloBraxton Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2009
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0
    He goes on a killing spree about six years later when he eventually loses his mind. =P
     
  8. ArckAngel
    Offline

    ArckAngel Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2008
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just end the paragraph with him staring intently at the gun. In the next paragraph have it start at the next important factor of the story. Not too difficult.
     

Share This Page