1. sophia_esteed
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    sophia_esteed Senior Member

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    So, how do you write a chapter you're not motivated to write at all?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by sophia_esteed, May 31, 2009.

    I'm currently trying to write down this chapter.
    It's not like it isn't important, because it links the story I've written so far with the last part of the novel, sort of like a gate, so it's kinda necessary.
    Basically, it works kinda like the part of a crime story in which the detective gives its explanation of how things went, even though he doesn't reveal the culprit yet.
    The problem is, I'm not really motivated. Chapters like this aren't my forte.
    I'm the type who prefers flashy action and fast-paced narration.
    I wouldn't call the situation I'm in writer's block yet, but still, I can't seem to pull through.
    So I was wondering what other people do, when facing this kinda situation?
     
  2. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    If it's that painfully tedious for you to write, it won't be much better to read. Maybe you need to rethink what takes place in that chapter.
     
  3. JGraham
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    JGraham Senior Member

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    Sometimes this happens to me, although i would say it is more or less i want to get to an action packed part and get through the dialogue parts. But these parts can be equally exciting as long as you make them interesting. I find motivation comes best when you just try and force yourself, but listen to music or do something. The point is you have to get through the part in order to get to your more exciting part. Just focus on that, and as Cog said, if it is really that tedious you may want to re-think the events. Although most explanation parts are heavy with dialogue. I usually try and split it up, tell half then go to another part, then come back. But my book has different view points, so i can do that.
     
  4. A2theDre
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    A2theDre Active Member

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    You say it's sort of a gateway chapter? I haven't been in this situation yet but I would probably look at what I want to happen in the next chapter and then offer a bit of introspection on the part of the character (in the gateway chapter) that could possibly be a prelude to the next chapter. A bit of philosophy, thoughts, etc.

    As has been said though, I doubt it's going to be much fun to read. Good luck!
     
  5. lordofhats
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    lordofhats Contributing Member

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    I agree. When I find I'm really bored and unmotivated to write a chapter, I usually later determine that chapter was unnecessary or needed to be spiced up.
     
  6. starseed
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    starseed Contributing Member

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    ^^ Agreed. Just don't give up on it. Keep tweaking it until you get somewhere you like. There are chapters in my book I now love that I hated working on at first because I wasn't sure what to do with them. There's always a way! When in doubt, work on another section for awhile and come back later after you've brainstormed a bit.
     
  7. lucyarden
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    lucyarden New Member

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    Hi, Sophia--

    I hear you. I undergo the same problem every time I come across a rather boring chapter that needs to be part of the book. What I'd recommend for you to do is change up the plot. True, you might be at a crucial crossroads where this isn't really the best idea--but it's always possible. I do this every time I come across a tedious chapter that needs to be written. Even if it's something small, like letting your main character meet a friend at a gardening class, adjusting the plot might be just what you need to get your creative juices flowing.

    -Lucy from How to Write (and Write Well)
     
  8. SilverWolf0101
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    SilverWolf0101 Active Member

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    I find the best way I power through chapters is to lock myself away where no one (pets or people alike) can bother me, turn up the music, and focus entirely on what I want to achieve. If the chapter is hard to write for me, I usually end up looking back through the other chapters and seeing what lead up to this chapter, then I think ahead and see what is going to be the end result. A lot of times I find that the way I was going to write the chapter isn't going to work like I thought it was going to, so instead I end up writing something else. In one of my stories, I have six different versions of the same chapter before I found the one I liked best and worked best for the ultimate goal I wanted to achieve.
     
  9. ThreeLeggdedRaven
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    ThreeLeggdedRaven New Member

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    When I run into situations like these, I often find that the only way around them is to break the conventions that are holding me back. For instance, if you have to get through this part to inform your reader, but you really want to just write the explosions and gun fire, why not mix the two. Set up a chase scene, or a fight on a rainy bridge/rooftop, but intermix the action and the explanation, then right before the last punch lands, throw your villain's face under a light bulb, or have them illuminated by a muzzle flash. Keep yourself interested by writing the parts you like, and the rest of us hooked on something a little different than what we're used to reading.
     
  10. JJ_Maxx
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    JJ_Maxx Banned

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    Holy necromancer, Batman! This thread is like four years old and the original poster hasn't set foot here in like, a year. :)
     
  11. 123456789
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    123456789 Contributing Member Contributor

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    Guess she never got past that chapter...
     
  12. lucyarden
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    lucyarden New Member

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    I think I've already responded to this thread, but oh well. I still have plenty to say on the topic. :)

    First of all, when I feel like a chapter is dragging on or I don't really want to write it, I evaluate myself and my book as honestly as I can. Will other chapters continue to bore me like this? If I feel this way, how about my readers? Is writing this book even a good idea? If the chapters are dragging on, I think my energy would be better spent on a book I'm passionate about. So I don't know if it's the entire story that's bothering you, but checking that could save you a lot of hassle down the line.

    If the story honestly is something that you want to write, though, and it's just that one chapter giving you trouble, I list reasons why I should finish this chapter. Sounds kind of weird, I know, but it works magic for me. When I imagine my finished story, ready to send off to an agent or editor, with this one chapter spoiling the entire package, it's fairly motivational--what kind of author doesn't want their entire book to be a success? I am a procrastinator, no doubts about it, but this method has worked well for me.

    Aside from that, sometimes starting over is the best thing you can do. One time, a chapter really wasn't working for me, so I rewrote the entire thing. I discovered I didn't have nearly enough conflict or character development in the first saggy draft, but now it is one of the most pivotal chapters in my entire novel.

    I hope I helped! I understand what you're going through--most writers do. :)

    -Lucy @ How to Write (and Write Well)
    www.howtowriteandwritewell.blogspot.com
     
  13. Nee
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    Nee Contributing Member

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    Why would you need an entire chapter to do that? I'm sure it can be done in one short scene (or maybe two).
     

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