1. Yandos
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    Yandos Member

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    Storytelling inside your story.

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Yandos, Mar 10, 2011.

    I am currently writing a chapter in which one of my characters is telling a ‘fairy tale’ to my 5 year old MC. This fairy tale is my own unique take on ‘The little match girl’. Now the problem I have is that the flow of the chapter seems a little stop & start and disjointed between the telling of the story and the interaction of my characters.

    Has anyone else had this problem and found a solution, or do you know of a story in which something like this takes place so I can see how it's done.
     
  2. Islander
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    Islander Contributing Member Contributor

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    It might feel more natural if your 5-year-old interrupts and asks questions a few times at the beginning of the fairy tale.
     
  3. travisbaker
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    travisbaker Banned

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    I read the book
    Think and Grow Rich - written by napolean hill
    he handled the story telling amazingly well to motivate the readers, refer to it and you will get a clue.
     
  4. senkacekic
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    senkacekic New Member

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    In one of my stories one of the main characters is sort of a storyteller and she mainly tells fairytales and legends. These extra-stories inside the "real" story explain the historical and mythological background of the protagonists and their culture.
    I always kind of segregated the "story-inside-story-stories" by giving them their own chapter. I didn't like them to be interrupted by questions and stuff, like it would usually (realistically!) be, and by giving them this kind of extra space I could cut out the actual protagonists and their actions.
    If any of you know Watership Down, I think there it is done in a similar way (as far as I remember at least, but when I read that book I was around 7).

    Of course my situation and story is absolutely different from yours, but maybe this is of some use for you...
     
  5. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    if you have your storytelling character 'tell' the fairy tale in largish chunks, it may help to do those as block indents, with regular narrative/dialog in between the chunks... that will keep you from confusing readers as to what parts are the ongoing story and which are the story being told by a character...
     
  6. Yandos
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    Yandos Member

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    The 'fairy-tale' in mine has a similiar role to play in my story.

    The thing is, I need the realistic aspect of the story being interupted so the reader gets an idea of how my little MC thinks and will likely react in future.
    My 'fairy-tale' has 3 functions in the book.
    1. My teller character is trying to prepare the MC of what might happen in the future.
    2. Give the reader an idea of how much of a sheltered life the MC has lived.
    3. An overall 'loose' foreshadowing of the main story.



    I think i'll try this, make the chunks bigger and see if it clears up matters. It seem like sound advice. Thanks!
     
  7. The Degenerate
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    The Degenerate Active Member

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    Check out Conrad's Lord Jim. It's almost told entirely through Lord Jim's telling of a story in dialogue.
     

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